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A List of Modern Quilters on Instagram

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Turkey Tracks: October 30, 2020

A List of Modern Quilters on Instagram

When I first got on Instagram, friends helped me with whom to “follow.” Meanwhile, the Mt. Battie Modern Quilt Guild started a challenge inspired by a group whose work appears on Instagram: #beesewcial.

But who are these wonderful modern quilters?

Here’s a list. I had to do a screen shot to get the list, and the text is light to read, but I think you can see it well enough if you want to follow any of these quilters on Instagram.

Thanks to these quilters for sharing their awesome creativity!

Written by louisaenright

October 30, 2020 at 8:55 am

The Paul Klee “Bee Inspired” Prompt

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Turkey Tracks: October 29, 2020

The Paul Klee “Bee Inspired” Prompt

The challenge “prompt” for this month’s block for the Mt. Battie Modern Quilt Guild’s ongoing “Bee Inspired” challenge—based on the quilting group of modern quilters called “Bee Sewcial” (see #beesewcial on Instagram for their work)—was Paul Klee.

What a fun challenge—which prompted me and I’m sure other members to take an online research trip to see Klee’s paintings. Klee (1879-1940) was a Swiss-born German modern painter whose work took place in the early 1900s. He was deeply interested in color theory.

I chose Klee’s “Characters in Yellow” for my prompt.

But I didn’t want to make the block in yellow as yellow stands out in a quilt like a flashing neon sign. So I used reds.

Klee loved geometric shapes. And in this painting he used analogous colors. And he kept his shapes intact for the most part. No one knows who the “characters” he depicted were. And it does not matter. That’s the whole point really.

I used the method I learned in The Color Collective for this quilt:

Tara Faughnan created this method, and created the visual impression of the blocks floating over the darker background by slashing the geometric shapes and installing strips of the background color. Here, too, the color palette is analogous.

So the “Modern” experiments with shape and color continue… And now Klee’s painting looks…static, fixed…to my eyes anyway.

I love my quilty journey.

Written by louisaenright

October 29, 2020 at 9:00 am

Design Wall Quilty Projects October 2020

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Turkey Tracks: October 22, 2020

Design Wall Quilty Projects October 2020

The wild goose quilt is OFF the design wall and all is prepped to load it into the longarm. It is GORGEOUS, and it chewed up a lot of stash fabric.

So, here’s what’s on the design wall now:

On the left are “kind of” leader/ender blocks taking shape—and both projects are meant to use up some of the solids I have acquired. I say “kind of” leader/ender projects as I also like to take some time just to play with these two projects.

The tree blocks are inspired by a quilt made by Crazy Mom Quilts, and the stripes below are inspired by a quilt made by Tara Faughnan, and I can already see that I need to include a lot more light fabrics. The light colors are what will make this quilt sparkle. I’m just cutting from the scrap box right now, for the most part. I’ll dig into the solid stash for small pieces next. I am very drawn to both of these projects.

Here’s Tara Faughnan’s quilt that I so like, and I think she teaches this quilt in one of her online classes. I didn’t take it as I’ve signed up for The Color Collective, which starts again in November. Tara is a really good teacher, and her work is so inspiring.

The developing blocks on the right are from Sajata Shah’s book CULTURAL FUSION QUILTS, and I posted info on that book a few days ago. I had a suite of more traditional fabrics that I thought would work to try this block out, and I’ve already had to comb through my stash and buy a few green fabrics to expand the original fabrics—which are the florals and the reds. I seem to run through green fabrics really fast, and the ones I have now are too bright for this quilt.

I did reverse the lower right block and I like it better this way:

Making this block is so much fun!!! I don’t know if this quilt will scratch this itch I have or if I will want to make it again with more modern fabrics—as with all the Cotton+Steel/Ruby Star Society fabrics I’d like to whittle down now.

And then there is the Sugaridoo QAL project to finish. The last row is out now, so I’ll get to that project again soon. When the last row is made and attached, I’ll be finished with construction on the top. I have backings for the two versions I am making.

In going through my stash again, I reviewed the several fabric suites and the two kits I’ve put aside. Those must be included in the UFO category I think. I am determined to NOT be one of those quilters who dies and leaves this enormous bunch of fabric for someone else to have to manage. And I am determined to NOT start any new projects that require the purchase of a whole bunch of new fabrics. I am having fun and making headway with that goal.

It’s all good.

Written by louisaenright

October 22, 2020 at 9:37 am

A Quilter’s Table Blog and Other Quilty Inspirations

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Turkey Tracks: October 16, 2020

A Quilter’s Table Blog and Other Quilty Inspirations

I am really, really enjoying this blog and highly recommend it to you.

Take a look?

https://aquilterstable.blogspot.com/2020/10/vista-toscana.html

AND, I just bought this book by Sajata Shah, which I am also really enjoying. Sajata is an improv, modern quilter who has been influenced by the Gee’s Bend quilters, fiber work in her native India, and fiber work in Africa. Like many of the modern quilters, she is carving out a place that blends traditional quilts with modern quilting. Much of her work, like the quilt on the cover, uses controlled free-form methods that are exciting and lively.

Apparently Sajata holds a workshop where some of the modern quilters that I like (see on Instagram #beesewcial) gather. Capitola quilter (see her work on Instagram) attended a gathering where participants worked on Sajata’s version of a Kaladiscope quilt called “Organized Chaos” (Instagram hashtag #organizedchaosquilt).

I’ve fallen in love with Capitola’s version—as I do with most, if not all, of her work.

I’ll probably be looking for kaladiscope quilt block patterns down the road. Ummmm….when I finish current projects.

Written by louisaenright

October 16, 2020 at 10:07 am

The Final Sugaridoo QAL Row

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Turkey Tracks: October 9, 2020

The Final Sugaridoo QAL Row

Here’s what this graphic, modern quilt looks like with the release of the final row.

I haven’t made mine yet as I’m finishing up a few other projects first. But this year-long journey has been fun and instructive. Look at all these fun patterns! And I’ve learned some new sewing methods for sure and am using them elsewhere.

The patterns and the videos will apparently stay “up” at the Bernina blog for some time if you want to check out anything in this project.

Written by louisaenright

October 9, 2020 at 9:15 am

“On Point” Quilt Finished

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Turkey Tracks: October 8, 2020

“On Point” Quilt Finished

This quilt is another very different project for me. But I loved making it, especially as decisions about the colors and the setting of the colors were made for me. The block that guest designer Denyse Schmidt created for Season 2 of The Color Cellective is BIG—20 inches.

This quilt is the final project (7), finished just in time for Season 3 to start in November.

I wasn’t quite sure how to quilt it, but opted in the end for this overall design with curves and some sharp points. I like the texture that developed a lot. The pantograph is Checks and Chase by Lorien Quilting. The row is 8 inches and is double, so 16 inches wide.

The thread color is the same kind of jade green that’s in the quilt—and that worked well too. It was dark enough for the darker fabrics and not too dark for the lighter. My fallback for quilt thread is always shades of grey, but they just didn’t work here with the mixtures of bright/dull/dark and light and dark. I use Signature 40-wt. all cotton thread on the longarm, and this thread color is Jade.

I also wasn’t sure what would work well as a backing, but I’m happy with this duller taupe colored fabric that has sprinkles of color that are, for the most part, also in the quilt. It’s Ruby Star Society, Speckles, and there is a very large range of colors in that line. This backing does not draw attention from the front of the quilt.

The luscious dark brown in the quilt provided enough for the binding, which I always cut on the bias. I did order extra dark brown in order to have enough for this 60 x 60 quilt. I could have easily and happily made this quilt much bigger, but wasn’t sure how it would come out in the end, if I would like the block, and so forth. I have tended to copy the Color Collective projects and then play with them—once I’m sure I understand how they work. I never think about using a luscious dark brown instead of black, but I will now.

November is coming up fast!

September Bee Inspired Block

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Turkey Tracks: October 2, 2020

September Bee Inspired Block

The Mount Battie Modern Quilt Guild met on Zoom recently and shared our blocks for September’s prompt challenge: our receiving member, Nancy Wright, wanted creative circles in brights placed on a neutral backgrounds.

You can see all the blocks we did on the Facebook page Mt. Battie Modern Quilt Guild.

I used the appliqué method I learned from our Sugaridoo QAL challenge in our other local quilting group, the Coastal Quilter’s (Maine). Sugaridoo used small half circles and then, in another row, 4-inch full circles. I hoped that a BIG circle would also work. It does.

I used one of my diner plates to trace the circle on the fusing side of 101 SF interfacing. I layed the interfacing circle on the FRONT of the newsprint fabric and sewed around the drawn circle. Next, clip away the inner circle and clip into the curves. Turn the interfacing to the back—and if you’ve got the fusible side next to the fabric, you can use the tip of the iron to lightly fuse the circle edge so it is stable and all the interfacing is no longer showing. (Don’t fuse any more than just around the circle edge.) Then you just lay the open newsprint/backingcircle over your prepared circle fabric and pin it down. Pull at the edges of the outer fabric to smooth everything down well. Next, sew around the edge of the (newsprint fabric here) circle—use a bigger stitch. Then trim out all the excess fabric on the back, leaving your backing intact of course. Finally, give the finished piece a nice ironing.

I’ve been looking for a painless way to create BIG circles where the method does not need a ruler. This method works for me.

I deliberately placed my circle off-center and left a lot of surrounding backing so Nancy will have lots of room to manipulate/trim my block when quilt top assembly begins.

Written by louisaenright

October 3, 2020 at 9:26 am

The Little Bag Is Done

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Turkey Tracks: September 30, 2020

The Little Bag Is Done

I finished this bag the other day. It’s the little version of Kelly Lautenbach’s Not Your Basic Blue (Ikea) Bag. Two of these will fit into the big bag, which I did some months ago.

I used the basting spray (505 is less smelly) this time, and that worked REALLY well. The fabric did not walk away from the Soft and Stable inner layer while I quilted the bag layers. And I have LOVED learning how to install leather straps.

Here’s how the inside of the bag looks. Lautenbach’s method of construction is really fun to make. I do hand sew the top binding down, as I would a quilt, as I am somehow unable to machine sew a seam like this so that it looks neat.

Here’s a close-up of the strap mechanism. The screws have two parts that screw together, and I use a little of the blue screw lock liquid to insure that they don’t come loose. The handles can be removed if one wants to wash the bag at some point.

You can see the size of the big bag here—it will hold three full-size quilts and has double straps to help lift and carry it—the longer size goes over one’s shoulders, and the smaller ones are for hands to help.

I think that I have enough carrying power now, don’t you? The grey bag is the Market Bag” from Noodlehead. But there is a middle-sized bag possibility for the Lautenbach bag…

Information on the leather handles and screws is on the earlier post of the big bag. One would need a leather hole punch for this work, but they are not expensive. https://louisaenright.wordpress.com/wp-admin/post.php?post=11585&action=edit.

Written by louisaenright

September 30, 2020 at 11:19 am

The Penultimate Sugaridoo QAL Row

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Turkey Tracks: September 27, 2020

The Penultimate Sugaridoo QAL Row

One more row to go! And that row will combine with a row already finished and not yet attached. These two rows will come at the green end of the quilt and are in the aqua blue family.

This penultimate row is the funky log cabin pink row, the second from the pink top. On the solid version, I followed Sugaridoo’s method—which I found to be more difficult than was needed. So, on the Cotton+Steel/Ruby Star version, I tried another method, and I liked it far better. See below.

Sugaridoo’s method makes a long strip where the strands are placed and sewn on a 45-degree angle and from which the 6-inch square of strips is cut. But it is very hard to keep the 45-degree angle consistent—so the strip can get wonky really fast. Plus, it requires a lot of sewing to even get to the point where you can cut the first block. I was sure I was going to run out of the pink fabric that came in the kit before I got all 8 blocks done. And it was darn close, I can tell you.

So for the second version, I cut out 6-inch blocks from very thin paper (old phone book pages or newsprint), drew a random 45-degree angle and sewed down strips that way. This method means you can use all the short pieces that form as you sew toward each corner. The 45-degree angles are easy to maintain, and the block is easy to trim up when you’ve covered the paper.

I do like this block a lot and think I’ll end up using it again down my quilty road.

Written by louisaenright

September 27, 2020 at 10:16 am

Elvira Quilt Done

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Turkey Tracks: September 23, 2020

Elvira Quilt Done

This quilt is a very different kind of quilt for me. But I have enjoyed the challenge of using these BIG blocks.

Gudrun Erla made this pattern available last winter for free some time as a way to join people together during the virus lockdowns. I liked the movement of the slashes that run through each block. I stood back and watched Bonnie Hunter take off with this project, then I dove into it.

I had fun just pulling these vivid pieces of fabric out of my stash and just letting everything roll along from row to row. Obviously, this quilt is a huge stash buster.

I pieced the backing, but it is mostly this purple fabric below. The rest of the backing is a coordinating magenta that you can see in the above picture in the second from the last row to the right. The big sun quilting doodling I did came from the backing fabric.

I really enjoyed this quilting. It was relaxing and fun—which is not usually the case for me as longarm quilting is my least favorite part of the quilting process.

I think this block would lend itself to coordinating fabrics—and I am especially thinking of baby quilt fabrics that I have in my stash. So don’t be surprised to see this block show up on this blog again.

There is a fat quarter version, and here is Gudrun’s web site and links to this pattern. She has a special ruler as well as instructions for not using the ruler—which I did.

Written by louisaenright

September 23, 2020 at 10:07 am