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Turkey Tracks: May 2018 Quilting Retreat Group Project

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Turkey Tracks:  May 20, 2018

May 2018 Quilting Retreat Group Project

This is the project I took for everyone at our recent Coastal Quilter’s Mother’s Day weekend retreat.

Each person got one of the flour sack towels and 21 hexes with which to play.

The flour sacks can be ordered from Amazon.  I paid about $18 for a set of 12.  Amazon has some sort of algorithm that will up the price on you if you order once or look more than once, so be aware…

I had fun using some different paper piecing shapes–the pentagons, for instance.

 

The towels are large and very white and very soft.  It’s fun to decorate them.  I used a fine thread so the back remained pretty clean.  You can bury knots of pearl cotton or embroidery thread under the hexes if you don’t want knots to show on the underside of the towel.

They are fun to use in the kitchen and the bathroom I think and would make great gifts.

Written by louisaenright

May 20, 2018 at 3:22 pm

Turkey Tracks: An Amazing Quilt

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Turkey Tracks:  May 20, 2018

An Amazing Quilt

I am behind on posts.  This picture came from our Coastal Quilters’ meeting in early May.  Spring is so busy for me.  And, I just returned from a wonderful quilty retreat.  More on that later.

But feast your eyes on this gorgeous quilt top.  The maker, a new member for Coastal Quilters, said there is one more border to do before this top is done.  I can’t wait to see it finished.

Written by louisaenright

May 20, 2018 at 3:08 pm

Turkey Tracks: “Winter: Dawn Trees” quilt

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Turkey Tracks:  May 8, 2018

“Winter:  Dawn Trees” Quilt

This quilt is my own design, and I really love the way it came out.  I am a bit fixated on winter trees anyway, and, also, on the amazing Maine winter dawn light that coats the earth with a marmalade color that I love.  Winter in Maine is, actually, very colorful.  I chose the purple of the trees based on the purple shadows that appear over the snow in winter.

The quilt started in a workshop with Amy Friend (blog:  during quiet time) that used her newly issued book IMPROV PAPER PIECING.  I drew the three blocks on what was then EQ7.  I have since upgraded to EQ8.  (The other quilt that came out of that workshop was a big star made with Cotton+Steel fabrics–see below and see an earlier blog post).

Right now the quilt is hanging in my quilt room–which is a bit messy as I’m packing for a weekend quilty retreat.

Sarah Fielke’s “The Seasons” in the book she co-authored with  Kathy Doughty:  MATERIAL OBSESSION 2.

I also have a bare trees pattern designed by Carolyn Friedlander which I may start next winter.  I love the pattern.

Here’s the Cotton+Steel Big Star Quilt:

Amy is a marvelous teacher, and the way she teaches her students how to design their own patterns is…wonderful.  And surprisingly easy.

 

Turkey Tracks: April 2018 Quilty Update

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Turkey Tracks:  May 2, 2018

April 2018 Quilty Update

“Winter:  Dawn Trees” is now sewn together and is being quilted–with a grid pattern on my domestic Janome 8900.  This quilt is my design, inspired by Amy Friend’s workshop and book, IMPROV PAPER PIECING.  I drew the three different blocks on EQ7 (now EQ8) and had that system print out the patterns.  I started with ALL tree blocks lined up in a traditional pattern of rows and rows–until after the workshop.  Then I put them into a more “modern” arrangement.  I really like the quilt and will post pics when it is totally finished, which won’t be long now.

Thanks Amy!!

Here is an EQ8 picture of what the quilt would have looked like if I had not added the fractured dawn light block and just lined up the trees.  Pretty, but not as interesting I think.

The main part of top of “Valse Brilliant” is done.  I’m now picking out the English Paper Piecing papers–at night while watching tv.  It’s a slow process, of course.  VB, as those of us doing it in Coastal Quilters Maine call it, comes from Willyene Hammerstein’s book MILLIFIORE QUILTS.  (I did not do WH’s border treatment.)  My “rules”–setting rules comes from workshops with Timna Tarr–were simple:  brights and text in every block.

I’m going to put some wide charcoal Essex Linen (blend) borders.  Right now, this quilt is not big enough, really, to be lap size.  The border fabric is washed, but NOT ironed yet.

Here are my monthly blocks for our Mt. Battie Modern Quilt Guild challenge to make Jen Kingwell’s “Long Time Gone” quilt.  It’s an improv type quilt.  I am using all Cotton+Steel.  Roxanne Wells gave me the idea of using the more formal quarter log cabin style to get stripes, and I like how that came out.  The courthouse step blocks started out being blue, green, and pink/red done in ombre, light to dark.  Then I decided I liked them mixed up better, so put all the darks together, all the mediums, and all the lights.

Here are my May blocks.  Yes!!  I am ahead now and have all of May to catch up with other projects.

Here’s what all my blocks look like now.  I’m really liking how they are going together.

And here is a reminder of what Long Time Gone looks like:

Turkey Tracks: Mt. Battie Modern April 2018 Meeting

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Turkey Tracks:  April 29, 2018

Mt. Battie Modern April 2018 Meeting

This month we shared the March blocks we did for our Jen Kingwell “Long Time Gone” quilt challenge:  tiny churn dash blocks sewn into two different bigger blocks and the crosses/star block.

Tori Manzi’s blocks are on the top; she is using grunge fabrics for the whole quilt.  Vicki Fletcher, the left column, is making her quilt from this suite of fabrics.  My blocks are in the middle column and are all Cotton+Steel.  Becca Babb Brott’s are on the far right and are scrappy.

Here is a line-up of our star and cross blocks:  Vicki, me, Tori, and Becca.  It is always amazing to me how different our work can be for the same block.  Sew fun!

Vicki is making this quilt, and I really love this block and the color palate she is using.  I have never thought about using half-square triangles to make a large diamond block.

Anne Bargetz brought us another of her quilts.  She is a new-ish member, and we are so enjoying getting to know her.  She is—local peeps—also working at Marge Hallowell’s Mainely Sewing in Nobleboro.  So say hello to her when you visit.

Next month:  the traveling quilts come out to play again.  Most of them will only have one more rotation before they go back to their owners to be finished.  Owners will get them back in July.

Written by louisaenright

April 29, 2018 at 9:13 am

Turkey Tracks: “Sweet Dreams” Quilt

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Turkey Tracks:  April 27, 2018

“Sweet Dreams” Quilt

Today is my youngest grandchild’s third birthday.  “Sweet Dreams” went into the mail to her and has been received.

The blocks are Tula Pink’s 100 Modern Quilt blocks, from her book of the same name.  This quilt was a challenge made to Coastal Quilters (Maine).  We did eight blocks a month until we were done.  Many of us have completed the project and some are almost done.  All of the quilts are gorgeous!

I used the “city scape” setting suggested by Tula Pink and put the lighter blocks on the top of the skyscrapers, per a suggestion by CQ President Sharon Flanagan.

And the blocks, grey sashing, backing, and binding are all Cotton+Steel fabrics.

I really love how my quilting came out.

Look at this fabulous backing fabric.  Could it be more perfect?  No.

Here are some of the blocks.

I love this quilt.  I didn’t really expect to love it as much as I do.  It’s one that caught me by surprise.  I’m really pleased with it.

Written by louisaenright

April 27, 2018 at 3:50 pm

Turkey Tracks: Amelia Poole: Couture Textile Studio

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Turkey Tracks:  April 29, 2018

Amelia Poole:  Ecoture Textile Studio

Fiber artist Amelia Poole came to Coastal Quilters last Saturday.

My what a nice program she gave us.

Amelia works with indigo dye processes AND with dyeing natural fabrics with local flora and fauna.  Amelia made her dress fabric—see below—using this latter process—which does involve treating natural fabrics with heated chemical solutions before attempting to get images from local leaves, ferns, seed pods, and the like.

She treated us to a history of humans using dyes they have made from the indigo plant—which is a complicated process, actually.  Did you know that this human endeavor can be traced back over thousands of years.  She showed us a slide of a 6,000 year old fabric that still held indigo dyes in the fibers.  The indigo plant itself (there are several varieties across the world) just looks…green.  Who knew it would dye things blue??

Every now and then I am so overwhelmed by something I’m observing that I forget to take pictures.  This paralysis happened with Amelia’s indigo dyed samples, which are fascinating and beautiful.  But you can see pictures on her web site:  http://ecouturetextilestudio.com.

 

The Coastal Quilters blog also has a lovely write-up—done by the talented Paula Blanchard—on Amelia’s work:

Coastalquiltersmaine1@wordpress.com.

And here are some pictures I did take of some of her dyed fabrics using local plants.

Amelia sells beautiful silk scarves if you are looking for something really special as a gift.  And she, of course, has indigo pieces to sell.

Written by louisaenright

April 20, 2018 at 3:47 pm