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Turkey Tracks: Old Raspberry Canes Project

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Turkey Tracks:  August 16, 2017

Old Raspberry Canes Project

This treat is now a thing of the past.  Frozen berries are never as sweet as the ones just off the canes.

I have been hard at work in the garden over the past few weeks.  Here I’m cleaning out the old raspberry canes–the ones that fruited.  Seven wheelbarrows full.  The area in front of the wheelbarrow has two raspberry problems:  two much shade and purple raspberries turning all the raspberries purple.  I pulled them out.

Now I need some plants to line this border.  Small shrubs?  Colorful perennials?  The two blue hydrangeas are not doing a thing this year.  That happens.  It has been a very cool, dry summer.

The full moon arrived last week.  It was so bright that when I turned out my reading light, I got out of bed and went downstairs to see what outside light I had left on by mistake in the yard.  I could have read a book with no trouble outside.

I seem to have a purple loosestrife infestation in the rocks next to the driveway.  It is terribly invasive and has clearly been there more than one year, hiding behind the trees and shrubs that come up in those shale rocks.  I got out what I could, but climbing up on that shale is not in the cards for me.  Oh my.  Not sure what to do about this problem.  The plants are wound around the rocks and are now full of seeds.  I was not looking for it up there anyway, as the area is so dry, and this plant likes wetlands.  I always look for it in the tiny meadow in front of my house as it can be wet.  My neighbors are going to kill me.

I have trimmed out what small trees and shrubs I could reach–the grandsons helped one day as well–but will have to call for help on the upper reaches.  If these trees are not cut back when young, they will grow and fall over the driveway in winter storms and be much harder to cut when larger.  Karma yoga with this project.

I have so enjoyed this summer.  Lovely family visits.  Cool weather.  Glorious strawberries and raspberries.  Beautiful flowers in the garden.  And Blue Hubbard squash vines that have gone quite beserk!  It’s the Little Shop of Horrors plant of my garden.  And it’s loaded with squash.  I hope they have time to mature.  Perhaps, as September is now the new August.  Blue Hubbards are HUGE.  And a lovely dusty blue.  They are great keepers and delicious!

We’ve had a lot of fog just along the coast this summer.  I went into town yesterday, and it was socked in.  Here’s what a pea soup fog looks like–from Laite Beach in Camden, Maine.  That harbor is full of boats, but they have…disappeared.

I actually love these fogs.

No rain.  Maybe Friday.

 

 

 

 

Written by louisaenright

August 16, 2017 at 5:21 pm

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Turkey Tracks: Quilts By Friends, July 2017

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Turkey Tracks:  August 16, 2017

Quilts By Friends, July 2017

Linda Satkowski is working on Katja Marek’s quilt-let project, from Marek’s web site and from the book THE NEW HEXAGON MILLIFIORE QUILT ALONG.”  She is using this gorgeous, coral color for her background.  I love it and asked her to roughly lay out her mostly finished blocks so we could see them at a recent Mt. Battie Modern Quilt Guild monthly sew-along meeting–Camden, Maine.

AND, friend Elizabeth (Betsy) Maislen, who is now RETIRED, is working on this quilt–which knocked my socks off.  Go Betsy!!

I will see Betsy soon as she will be in and out of my house (as will husband Bill) while she is on the windjammer J&E Riggin, out of Rockland, Maine.  Betsy volunteers and helps Annie Mahle cook.  The two together produce some awesome meals–all fresh, local produce, seafood, and meats.  This year, Betsy will be volunteering for roughly six weeks in September and October.

Turkey Tracks: “Uh, No! Just no!”

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Turkey Tracks:  August 14, 2017

Uh, NO! Just NO!

Here’s what happens when you return to a complicated piecing project after a month AND think you know just what to do!!!

The red blocks should be PURPLE.

What was I thinking???

I spent five hours at our monthly Coastal Quilters Sit and Sew sewing FOUR of these blocks all wrong.

Fortunately the blocks are on the OUTSIDE.

Still took me three or so hours to fix.

But, here’s the “YES!”

The red stars are formed by the sashing pieces.

To refresh:  I did all these units absolutely on time last fall, but…  Got sidetracked with putting them together.

I am ALMOST done now.

Written by louisaenright

August 14, 2017 at 4:49 pm

Turkey Tracks: Maine’s Pine Tree Quilt Guild Show

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Turkey Tracks:  August 14, 2017

Maine’s Pine Tree Quilt Guild Show

I was able to attend this show for a quick run-through one morning while my family visitors went off to Squirrel Island.

The show has recently changed its judging process and categories.

And, the show winner is now deemed “Best of Judged.”

There is now a non-judged hanging quilt category for “modern” quilts.

There were rows and rows of red and white quilts–to honor the show’s 40th anniversary.

And rows of gorgeous functional quilts that one wraps up in to feel the love.

I saw a LOT of Bonnie Hunter quilts in all kinds of colors, and each one was so lovely.  Some groups had obviously used Bonnie’s patterns to create challenges for each other.

I LOVED this selvage quilt.  Do you recognize the star pattern Vicki Fletcher used to start her “traveling” quilt–and which Linda Satkowski paper pieced in miniature for Vicki’s quilt–see earlier posts–but this one has an added small triangle at the center, which makes the on-point block in the middle of the star.  And look at the selvage borders.

Here’s one of the quilts in the modern grouping.

Another improv one I liked:

And, another.

I like the free-hand nature of the blocks in these quilts–and the improv nature of making and joining them.  I like the energy.  I like the grid quilting in many of these quilts.  And, often, the heavy use of solid fabrics.

I like to think of traditional quilting as being about a “community” of blocks that make secondary patterns with each other–producing all sorts of crossing paths and connections.  To me, modern quilting is about individuals–each free and stand-alone.  They can join to make a “community,” but not in the same way traditional quits do.  I love both.  And there is in the modern movement, something called traditional modern, or something like that, which blends the two.

Here’s the Coastal Quilters’ (Maine) Challenge quilt for 2017:  Dawn Chorus.

Sarah Ann Smith found this idea on Pinterest a few years ago and proposed it as a challenge for us.  It was created on Pinterest by Terry, Draw Me A Line.  The idea, and others like it, can be seen on Pinterest at this link:

If you belong to a group interested in this kind of project, and my link does not work, you can find it in the Pinterest Art section, under group projects.   I think it would lend itself to paints as well as fabric.  And to other animals besides birds.  There are other examples of this idea at the link.  Per Terry’s Draw Me A Line Pinterest instructions, Sarah painted the sky and tree-limb background on a large piece of heavy something and cut it into numbered squares, which members took away with them in May of 2015–with the assignment to reproduce the background and add a bird and leaves and bring back the square in May of 2016.  Sarah organized putting the completed squares back together, hanging the completed quilt on its black backing, and getting it to the show with all the attendant paperwork.  Thank you, Sarah, for a fun challenge.

Here is Sarah  with her “Best of Judged” winner at the show.

Congratulations, Sarah!

In the best of my memory, in the 13 years I’ve attended this show, this is the first art quilt to ever win it.

Sarah has an awesome blog, teaches at the big show in Houston, has a special exhibit for emerging artists there this year, and has published several books.  Her quilts have been displayed world-wide.

 

Written by louisaenright

August 14, 2017 at 4:47 pm

Turkey Tracks: Mt. Battie Modern Traveling Quilts in July 2017

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Turkey Tracks:  August 12, 2017

Mt. Battie Modern Traveling Quilts in July 2017

Our “traveling” quilts are getting bigger.  AND MORE EXCITING!

Here’s what I did to Joanne Moore’s quilt,  I connected one of her original blocks, the big square on the bottom to the right of the lower stars.  I thought it had the same organic feel of the curved block to the left of it. I added the colorful vertical strips to set off this next section, a la Jen Kingwell.  And, added blocks of “made” fabric, as I know Joanne is “making” fabric too.  Then I added the long sweeping “stem” filled with text-fabric leaves–from a fabric collection on Becca Babb-Brott’s Etsy Store, Sew Me A Song.  We were challenged to make and use bias tape, using a guide from the Lucky Spool Media workbook:  MIGHTY LUCKY Quilting Club 2016 Workbook, chapter one by Krista Fleckenstein, “Quilts from Your Sketchbook:  Shapes and Curves Using Bias Tape.”

Becca Babb Brott did not want her quilt blocks connected.  Lynn Vermeulen added to it by making the AWESOME birds and butterfly blocks.  I can’t wait to see how this quilt turns out.  It’s got some really interesting blocks going on–and more to come.

Becca’s theme words are “The More I Wonder, the More I love.”

Vicki Fletcher added this adorable dog block to Megan’s quilt.  She added the hexie flowers as Megan does a LOT of EPP work, including finishing Willyne Hammerstein’s “La Passacaglia” quilt.  Look at the Cotton+ Steel fabrics and the selvage dog collar.  Megan LOVES her two dogs.  The coral background adds some zip to the other blocks as well.  I love this block addition.

Here’s another shot of  how the blocks in this quilt are shaping up.

Tori Manzi worked on Margaret Elaine Jinno’s quilt–adding the funky, fun, clever “village” components below.  M-E’s theme is “village”–as in, I think, it takes one to…

Love the stained glass church windows:

I am apparently tree crazy at the moment, so, yes, I love these trees.  The funky houses are spectacular!

 

Becca made this amazing line of color paint tubes–carefully geared to the Allison Glass fabrics Tori used in her flying geese circle.  And, I think, the line of on-point squares.  She tried to link the blocks but felt something was missing, so left them alone.

Nancy Wright added the colorful sewing machine and awesome dressmaker fabric to Lynn’s quilt.  Lynn is now saying she does not mind if this quilt becomes larger than a small wall-hanging.  Megan added the embroidered red heart on the left.  Quilters use embellishment and red work frequently.

Becca made this astonishing foundation pieced lighthouse for Linda Satkowski’s quilt.  (She did double duty this month as Margaret Elaine had an operation on her hand, which is much better but not able to sew yet.)

This block is a terrific addition to this quilt.  Terrific.

Linda worked on Vicki’s quilt, adding the smaller stars on the bottom and the selvage tulip with it’s bias strip stem and leaves.  Isn’t that a clever use of selvages?  And the bias tape project here answers Becca’s challenge to us.  The small foundation pieced stars replicate the bigger star with which Vicki started this quilt.  Clever, innovative, adorable ideas here.

I am working on this quilt now–and I’m having so much fun coming up with ideas for this quilt.

We are skipping August as everyone is so busy in this late summer time.  We will again bring the quilts to our September meeting.

I can’t wait.

Turkey Tracks: Second Family Visit July 2017

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Turkey Tracks:  August 12, 2017

Second Family Visit July 2017

Hello there!

I have not disappeared totally.  I have just been enjoying the richness of a July filled with family visits.

Both sons came in July, bringing their wonderful families with them.

I posted after the younger son’s terrific visit–with some pictures for family and friends who read this blog.

The older son’s family left last weekend–also after a terrific visit.

All sewing pretty much halted, except for some hand sewing on the millifiore here and there.

So, July life was busy and full of shared experiences.

The children in my older son’s family are older now–so are “up” for exploring.  Some or all of them went on an eco tour on the Lively Lady to learn about lobsters and other Bay life, to Squirrel Island, to Hupper Island, and to Bar Harbor.  They, too, fell in love with the Ducktrap river, where it runs into the bay.  They hunted in the low-tide shallows for green crabs (at one point taking all my kitchen tongs to help in the capture), enjoyed the flora and fauna of this spot which is so different from southern beaches, and swam the river on the incoming tide by using the forceful inner flow to carry them from one side to the other.  (Maine has big tides.)  They can all swim to the float at Barret’s Cove on Megunticook Lake–a rite of passage.  And, one day, they were terrific help with gardening tasks, from mowing, to weed whacking, to pulling and storing this year’s garlic, to trimming trees and shrubs, to weeding crab grass, to dead-heading, etc.  They were amazing.

Somehow I have only these pictures, taken by their parents at Bar Harbor atop Cadillac Mountain.  I was having too much fun to carry around my phone for its camera.

Good visit!

 

 

Written by louisaenright

August 12, 2017 at 10:11 am

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Turkey Tracks: How to Fold a Quilt to Minimize Creases – Quilting Digest

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Turkey Tracks:  August 12, 2017

HOW TO FOLD A QUILT TO MINIMIZE CREASES

Hopefully you also know NOT to put cotton quilts into any kind of wooden chest as a chemical reaction occurs between the wood and the cotton, especially with dyes in the cotton.  Or, on any kind of UNTREATED (as in varnish or paint) wood, like an unpainted ladder.

And, not to put a quilt into a plastic box for storage.

Fold quilts, as below, put into a clean pillow case, and store on shelves, like closet shelves.  Quilts need to breath.

Source: How to Fold a Quilt to Minimize Creases – Quilting Digest

Written by louisaenright

August 12, 2017 at 9:50 am