Louisa Enright's Blog

Mainely Tipping Points

Poems: Haiku 2

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November 15, 2017

Haiku 2

October 2017

 

Crimson maple flames

Against corner of gold house

Earth’s revolution

 

 

Written by louisaenright

November 15, 2017 at 11:50 am

Posted in Poems

Turkey Tracks: Washing with Water

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November 15, 2017

Washing With Water

Now.  Don’t laugh.

I’ve been washing clothes with water and a magnet system for the past two months.

My clothes are as clean as if I had doused them with a detergent.

I still have to spot treat stains, but I had to do that before using the magnets.  And sometimes I have added some tea tree oil to the washer or dryer if I thought there were mold/mildew issues that needed to be addressed or I just wanted to add a clean, fresh scent.  Adding any of your favorite essential oils would give laundry their smell.

And, no, my clothes don’t smell like whatever they got into before I washed them without the essential oil addition.

I am on a well, so I don’t have the added ingredients that city folks have, like chlorines and fluorides.  Those chlorine chemicals also clean.

I have to tell you, I like what is happening a lot.  I am so less itchy these days.

 

++++

 

I don’t know that I’m ready to outright recommend this system to you.

I’m still experimenting.

For instance, I wanted to make sure that the clothes being washed weren’t holding a lot of residual soap–and that’s going to take some time–especially since I just switched out summer t-shirts for warmer winter ones.

But I can say that it is pretty clear to me that the recommended amounts of soap I had been using is excessive, to say the least.

You know, I can remember back when I was a kid, and every other ad on the tv was for some kind of cleaning product, but laundry detergents were there a lot.  I think we got kind of indoctrinated that we needed all these chemicals.

I stopped soaping off in my showers years ago, and, again, my skin is so much better because of using less soap.  I do use soap when I’ve gotten into something really greasy or dirty, but mostly, the warm water is good enough.  Best of all, I’m preserving the natural colonies of critters (good “germs”) that are are first line of defense on the skin that is the largest organ we have.  I don’t smell.  I am not dirty.

Water, I’ve learned, is actually pretty naturally corrosive in and of itself.  You might need a bit of soap for a grease stain, but not for just cleansing and refreshing fabric that is not greasy.

And history shows pretty clearly that terrible diseases got eradicated by cleanliness and quarantines.  Changes in hygiene practices made all the difference.  And hygiene maybe does not need so much soap.  We have germ phobias that have been carefully developed by advertising.  Some critters are good guys.

 

+ + ++

 

Soap works by making water slippery, which works to pull dirt and grime out of fabrics.

Powerful magnets can apparently change the surface tension of the water in the same way–or so the claim goes.

I bought two of these really strong magnets, and they live in my washing machine.

 

The company is Water Liberty, and you can check out their videos and claims at waterliberty.com.

I am now considering getting their Nano towels and their highly concentrated enzyme cleaner for stains.  I’ve been using enzymes in my hot tub for years now.  They eat organic matter, and they work really well.

 

Written by louisaenright

November 15, 2017 at 11:39 am

Turkey Tracks: My Milli is FINISHED: “Butterscotch Fall”

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Turkey Tracks:  November 15, 2017

My Milli is FINISHED:  “Butterscotch Fall”

I love this quilt.

I love everything about it.

I have loved every minute spent making it.

This quilt stretched me.  It let me go off into all sorts of new quilty directions.

Here is “Butterscotch Fall.”

One year ago, in early fall, I got inspired for the milli fabric by a range of fall fabrics I saw in local quilting stores–and that inspiration set me off.  I had been trying to come up with focus fabrics for this quilt project over the summer.  As I worked on the quilt, the butterscotch color kept coming on stronger and stronger–some times lighter, sometimes as dark as honey.  When the top was finished and I was hunting for backing, I knew when I saw this 108-inch wide Carolyn Friedlander cross-hatch fabric , called Butterscotch, that I had both my quilt’s backing and its name.  (This fabric is from Friedlander’s Architextural line.)

I wanted this quilt to have an organic feel of fall:  colorful leaves, trees going bare, bees, hives, the idea of harvesting fall honey, blue water under a vibrant autumn blue sky, vivid green moss, the ghosts of Halloween, the grey and blacks of the darkening days and longer nights, and so on.

I was paralyzed about how to quilt the top when I remembered that Jo Diggs once told Coastal Quilters members that you can’t go wrong with using a Bishop’s Fan pattern to quilt.  I liked the idea of this old-fashioned pattern on this modern quilt, which in turn used ancient millefiori rosettes as its design.  And I have the Bishop’s Fan groovy boards for the long arm.  (If you don’t know Jo Diggs, take a minute and look at her web site gallery.)

You will see a Japanese text fabric used in all its color ways in this quilt.  For instance, it’s in the grey star above and in the star below in gold.  These fabrics were designed by Suzuko Koseki.

 

 

 

 

 

Here’s the first rosette, which began to set the tone for the quilt:

 

I am so proud of this quilt.

It is PERFECT!!!

Thanks you so much Katja Marek!

Interesting Information: Mercola Post: Should You Get the Flu Shot?

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November 14, 2017

Mercola Post:  Should You Get the Flu Shot?

As I noted in the previous post, I will be 73 in March 2018.

The subject of the flu and shingles vaccines comes up frequently in my network of senior citizens.

Please read the section in the previous post about why our doctors are pushing these two vaccines for seniors.

This Mercola post provides much-needed information.

Here is a synopsis, and the link, which has a lot of information beyond the synopsis, is below.

Story at-a-glance

  • At the end of 2015, a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) analysis revealed that, between 2005 and 2015, the influenza vaccine was less than 50 percent effective more than half of the time
  • During the 2015/2016 flu season, FluMist, the live virus nasal spray, had a failure rate of 97 percent. The CDC did not recommend it last year and still recommends against using it during the 2017-2018 flu season
  • Shoulder injuries related to vaccine administration, which includes chronic pain, limited range of motion, nerve damage and frozen shoulder, are typically the result of the injection being administered too high on the arm
  • The 2016-2017 flu vaccine, which was very well-matched to circulating viral strains and hailed as “one of the most effective in years,” turned out to be another dismal failure
  • The vaccine had no clear effect in those between the ages of 18 and 49. Ditto for the elderly. Among young children, the effectiveness was about 60 percent. In other age groups, the effectiveness topped out at 42 percent

https://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2017/11/09/2017-2018-flu-vaccine-update.aspx?utm_source=dnl&utm_medium=email&utm_content=art1&utm_campaign=20171109Z1_UCM&et_cid=DM165078&et_rid=112632491

 

Additionally, the flu shot still has mercury in it.

Drug store employees are not properly trained in all cases to administer the shot and would likely have no training of what to do if there is a dangerous reaction.

There is mounting evidence that multiple flu shots reduce your ability to handle the flu.

Immunologists are quite clear that they do not fully understand the human immune system.

Vaccines have many, many unintended consequences that are detrimental to human health.  These consequences are well documented, but are not discussed widely by mainstream media.

One of the better vaccine informational sites is the National Vaccine Information Center,  NVIC.org.

Written by louisaenright

November 14, 2017 at 2:21 pm

Interesting Information: What About Getting the Chicken Pox and Shingles Vaccines?

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Interesting Information:  November 14, 2017

What About Getting the Chicken Pox and Shingles Vaccines?

I will be 73 in March 2018.

The topic of flu shots and shingles vaccines comes up often in my network of senior citizens.

I had chicken pox as a child, but I got shingles last May.  And let me tell you that shingles is NO FUN.  I still have nerve damage and itching.

The flu and shingles vaccines are heavily promoted by doctors and nurses for those in my age range.  The “why” of that is complicated and isn’t about human health.  Doctors and nurses are now workers in an industry where actual science is often no competition against profit.  There is, also, a monopoly formation going on in medicine in which outside businesses are buying up hospitals and doctors’ practices, and they are calling the medical shots.  Big Pharma profits from all vaccines and is trying to expand its market share.  Further Big Pharma and doctors cannot be sued for any vaccine damage–and there is plenty.  The so-called “vaccine court” has paid out billions of dollars for damage incurred by individuals from vaccines.  Big Pharma has created pretty lucrative incentives for individual doctor practices and hospitals.  Big Pharma has even been able to get the US government to write laws that incentivize hospitals to give vaccines.  The higher percentages of vaccines given, the bigger payout the hospital gets from medicare.  Insurance companies incentivize individual practices.  It is a rigged system.  And if you are not aware of it, and most aren’t, you just go along, mostly because we should be able to trust our medical personnel.  They are, many times, good medical people.  But they, too,  are trusting of “the system.”  Or their hands are tied as they are, now, just workers in the system and would be fired if they do not follow the “standards of care,” which has been crafted by industry.  Let’s just remember that doctors are NOT SCIENTISTS.  They are practitioners who know only what they are taught unless they decide to research for themselves.  And most don’t.  Besides, as I said, it is a very lucrative system for them for the most part.

The link below takes you to a comprehensive GOVERNMENT study out of the National Institutes of Health that concludes that the chicken pox and shingles vaccine (they are the same thing) have created significant unintended consequences, don’t work permanently, are creating unnecessary and significant expenses for people, and are creating a cycle of treatment and disease.  THIS VACCINE SHOULD BE STOPPED.

The cycle of treatment and disease derives in part from the fact that shingles is a LIVE virus and sheds to other people from someone who got the vaccine.  Those test tube strains are most likely not the same strain as the wild virus I got as a child.  So, I was unprotected and got shingles.

Here is the conclusion from the study:

15. Conclusion

Prior to the universal varicella vaccination program, 95% of adults experienced natural chickenpox [162](usually as pre-school to early elementary school children)—these cases were usually benign. In the prelicensure era, the periodic exogenous boosting that adults received from those shedding VZV resulted in long-term immunity. This high percentage of seropositive individuals and their long-term immunity have been compromised by the universal varicella vaccination of children which provides at best 70–90% protection [142,163–166] that is temporary and of unknown duration—shifting chickenpox to a more vulnerable adult population which, as Dr. Jane Seward cautioned in 2007, carries 20 times more risk of death and 10–15 times more risk of hospitalization compared to chickenpox in children [167]. Thus, the proponents for universal varicella vaccination have failed to consider increased HZ-related morbidity as well as the adverse effects of both the varicella and HZ vaccines which have more than offset the limited benefits associated with reductions in varicella disease. The universal varicella (chickenpox) vaccination program now requires a booster vaccine for children and an HZ vaccine to boost protection in adults. However, these are less effective than the natural immunity that existed in communities prior to licensure of the varicella vaccine. Hence, rather than eliminating varicella in children as promised, routine vaccination against varicella has proven extremely costly [60,62,168] and has created continual cycles of treatment and disease.

Here’s the link:

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3759842/

Written by louisaenright

November 14, 2017 at 2:03 pm

Turkey Tracks: Hats to Donate for Children

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Turkey Tracks:  November 14, 2017

Hats to Donate for Children

I am always appreciative of and amazed with the number of donated winter hats, mittens, and scarves that our Maine local women make for our community children.

Margaret Elaine Jinno, of Coastal Quilters (Maine), came to our CQ Sit and Sew last Wednesday with this batch of colorful hats she had made for school children–hats requested by someone at the elementary school who wanted some extras to protect the heads of forgetful children:

I liked them all, but I loved this one:

Here they all are:

Go Margaret Elaine!

Written by louisaenright

November 14, 2017 at 1:25 pm

Turkey Tracks: Valse Brilliante Project

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Turkey Tracks:  November 9, 2017

Valse Brillante Quilt Project

The block pile for the English Paper Piecing “Valse Brilliant” is growing.  This quilt is from Willyene Hammerstein’s book MILLEFIORE QUILTS.  And this work was one of the many Coastal Quilters (Maine) challenges proposed and started last winter.

There are close to 40 now.  I need just under 100 blocks I think.

My rules are brights and text fabrics, every block must have both.  Two forms of blocks emerge, one with darker color on the wide pieces and one with darker color on the narrow pieces.  When I glued block pieces, I often made both versions from the two chosen fabrics.  You can see both versions below:

 

I had fun with this block, which uses one of the Cotton+Steel whimsical fabrics with a desert motif and one of the C+S basic fabrics:

I have also used a lot of the “pearl bracelet” fabrics, both large and mini, from Lizzy House from Andover because they have such clear, bright colors.

I found an old computer laptop lap support tucked away in John’s technical supplies.  It works perfectly as a platform for English Paper Piecing blocks.

It is thicker on one side, and I put that side next to my body so my hands and arms have support.  This laptop platform saves a lot of wear and tear on arm, wrist, and neck muscles.  When I am putting on binding, I use a fat couch pillow for support.  Otherwise, I am always bending my neck over too far.

My as yet unnamed millefiori quilt (Katja Marek) is done but for one side of binding.  Pics to follow soon.  It may be my most favorite quilt ever.