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Interesting Information: What are Chemtrails and How Are They Harming Our Food and Water?

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Interesting Information:  February 14, 2017

What Are Chemtrails and How Are They Harming Our Food and Water?

I keep reading about “chemtrails.”

This article documents what is in them and shows patents supposedly for them, but it does not document WHO has authorized this practice–beyond the conspiracy theory of “global government.”  And it does not document fully who exactly is using chemtrails and when.  Did a whole line of US presidents approve this practice with nary an objection?  Did all those pilots never mention this program, this duty?  Seems hard to believe.

According to this article, here’s what’s in them, in part:

Chemtrails are geo-engineered aerosols that are loaded with toxic chemicals, including but not limited to: barium, strontium 90, aluminum, cadmium, zinc, viruses and “chaff.” Chaff looks like snow but it’s actually Mylar fibers (like in fiberglass) coated with aluminum, desiccated blood cells, plastic, and paper. Polymer chemist Dr. R. Michael Castle has studied atmospheric polymers for years, and he has identified microscopic polymers comprised of genetically-engineered fungal forms mutated with viruses, which are now part of the air we breathe.

Monsanto is said to be making the chemical mixture.

In the late 1960s Monsanto supported the secret Muad’ Dib Geoengineering Lab to develop chemtrail technology; their crown jewel program to protect earth from global warming via weather control. Sounds so humanitarian, right? Wrong!

 I don’t know…

Industry can be pretty powerful, especially when aligned with “national security.”  But this powerful for this long time?

I’m keeping an open mind, but I want better proof than I am finding here.

What do you think?

Source: What are Chemtrails and How Are They Harming Our Food and Water? | The Truth About Cancer

Written by louisaenright

February 14, 2017 at 4:22 pm

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Turkey Tracks: February Quilty Update

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Turkey Tracks:  February 14, 2017

February Quilty Update

I love winter because I have lots of uninterrupted time to sew.  Plus, I love snow.

I am ticking along with all the various projects and having fun seeing them come together.

Here’s Katja Marek’s EPP millifiore quilt in progress.  I have almost finished a large section at the bottom left  and will be adding it soon.  It’s in shades of blue.  And the addition of the blue will make the left edge complete.

Yes, this quilt is very funky, and I have no idea how it will look when it’s done, but…  I am having fun.

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You can see the piles of completed blocks of the Farmer’s Wife–each a column–above the millifiore.

That top was finished last night.

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I liked the zig-zag setting, but it requires cutting four of the blocks in half on the short rows!!!  I thought the quilt too long and skinny, so added two columns and used the five extra blocks I had on the upper left (2) and lower right (3).

I got a little OCD–ok, a lot OCD–about setting up blocks for one of Willyne Hammerstein’s quilts, “Valse Brilliante.”  Hammerstein is Austrian, and her colors are very European.  I’m doing my version in brights and neutrals, and each block will have some text fabric in it.  I got a bundle of “pearl bracelet” fabrics that are bright and colorful, so I ironed them all, and I can’t bear to put them away again until I’ve finished.  There are also some bright Japanese daisy prints I like–as you can see below.  It actually takes a while to set up one of these blocks, but now that I’ve used up all the red wonderclips, I’ve slowed down.  I try to sew EPP with matching thead as much as is possible.

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I have these fabrics left to cut and glue:

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Some of us here in Camden, Maine have formed the Mt. Battie Modern Quilt Guild, which is in addition to our venerable Coastal Quilters, which is a chapter in the Pine Tree Quilt Guild.

I am so drawn to the “modern” fabrics and the graphic nature of the modern quilts.  And, there is a strand that is modern/traditional, or some such title.   So, we are going to have even more quilty goodness.

We are going to do a “traveling” quilt and will turn in our initial pieces on March 2nd.  I have made this piece as my offering and look forward to seeing how it comes back to me.  I’m not thinking this piece will be a center medallion that gets developed.  And I will go back in with pearl cotton when the quilt is layered to embellish such as the exclamation point at the end of the “Love.”  The “blue moon” and the back side of the sliver moon were cut with one of those rotary circle cutters–which I learned from our workshop with Timna Tarr.

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My alphabet was modeled on the one I found in Mary Lou Weidman and Melanie Bautista McFarland’s OUT OF THE BOX WITH EASY BLOCKS.

We had a major snowstorm starting Monday night and ending Tuesday night–a blizzard.  There was a near complete “white out” and lots of high wind.  I have about 2 feet of MORE snow on the ground now.  As the storm abated, I made my way down the steep drive to my mailbox and retrieved the first Cotton+Steel fabric club package from Pink Castle fabrics.  Isn’t it pretty?

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I’m already thinking about making the next set of Tula Pink’s 100 City blocks.  Some of us are doing 8 blocks a month.  (You can see an earlier post on that challenge.)

I hope your winter is wonderful!

Enjoy it.  Slow down.  Hibernate.  Spring with all of its energy will be here in due course.

Interesting Information: The High-Cost, High-Risk World of Modern Pet Care

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Interesting Information:  February 4, 2017

The High-Cost, High-Risk World of Modern Pet Care

 

This article is fascinating, whether or not if you own pets.  It’s all about consolidation in the veterinary business–and yes it is very much a business.

I would also point out that consolidation is also going on in mainstream medicine.  Businesses are buying up hospitals and private practices, so medicine is, often, now about making money, not about either people or science.

What results is a “one size fits all” practice that is not good for either humans or pets.

Here’s a quote from the article:

An annual postcard reminding you that your dog or cat is due for its shots—“it’s time for the tough love”—is the main way veterinarians get pets in the door each year. That’s why many animal doctors, at every kind of practice, have chosen to ignore guidelines from the AAHA, which since 2003 has recommended dogs not be given what are called the core vaccines—for distemper, parvovirus, and adenovirus—more often than every three years. Indeed, the guidelines say a single series of these shots is probably enough to provide a lifetime of immunity.

Dog vaccines are NOT scaled to a pet’s weight.

Here’s another quote:

A pet may receive dozens of shots in a lifetime, at a cost of hundreds of dollars, but surprisingly little research has been done to find out how safe they are, and there is wide disagreement among experts. A 2005 study by Purdue University using Banfield data from more than 1 million medical records found 38 adverse reactions for every 10,000 shots, a rate of about 0.4 percent. Schultz and a research partner, Jean Dodds, argue the numbers are much higher, more like 3 percent or 4 percent, with about 1 in 200 dogs experiencing life-threatening reactions such as anaphylactic shock. “Vaccines can kill,” Schultz says. “If you don’t need to vaccinate annually and you do, you’re taking unnecessary risks.”

One size does not fit all.  Not for pets, and not for people.

This article, however, is much more about consolidation.  Treatments, like pushing vaccines, are just examples of how industry is trying to get more money from each person or pet that walks through the door.

 

Source: The High-Cost, High-Risk World of Modern Pet Care – Bloomberg

Written by louisaenright

February 4, 2017 at 2:30 pm

Turkey Tracks: Tula Pink’s 100 Modern Blocks

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Turkey Tracks:  February 4, 2017

Tula Pink’s 100 Modern Blocks

Some Coastal Quilters have issued a new challenge for 2017 to members:  to make Tula Pink’s “City Sampler” from her book 100 Modern Blocks.

(We are sewing our Farmer’s Wife blocks into tops now.)

 

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Again, we will do about 9 blocks a month, ending in December.

These blocks are all about the fabric and, unlike the Farmer’s Wife blocks, are pretty easy.  Indeed, they are FUN!

I am going to use Cotton + Steel in all of my blocks, but will allow myself some digressions with other designers mixed in, like some of the Japanese fabrics I like, some Carolyn Friedlander, and some solids, including shot cotton.

Here my first 9 blocks:

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As with the Farmer’s Wife blocks, adding solids can work to sharpen other fabrics–which I did not do unfortunately.  The top left block needed some solids as the fabrics are too jumbled together.  What can be pretty when looking at big pieces of fabrics can…not be…when pieces are small.  You would think I would have learned that lesson after all the Farmer’s Wife blocks.  But, no…

The bottom right “jacks” block also needed more definition.  The aqua is too busy.

Having said that, as with the Farmer’s Wife blocks, they all look pretty when they get into a quilt top.

The main thing is to have some fun with each block and not to stress about perfection.  Some work better than others.

This collection came in the mail today, from Craftsy:  Cotton + Steel “basics.”  They should help with the basics problem.  If you haven’t discovered Craftsy fabrics yet, take a look.  Also, I like the Etsy store, Stash Builders for specific colorways, etc.  And, of course, I continue to love Becca Babb-Brott’s Etsy store, Sew Me A Song.

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I got my first low-volume monthly shipment from Pink Castle fabrics, and it was beautiful.  I treated myself some time around Christmas.  I have since changed this fabric club to Cotton + Steel, but I really loved the first low-volume shipment from them.  Hmmmm…  I continue to be enchanted with low-volume fabrics.

I hope readers are having a good quilty winter.  I know I am.

 

Turkey Tracks: Cabbage “Steaks”

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Turkey Tracks:  January 30, 2017

Cabbage “Steaks”

I saw a recipe for cabbage “steaks” on Facebook not along ago.

I am one of those people who LOVE all roasted vegetables, so I thought I’d try this one.  I’ve roasted cabbage sliced thin into shreds before and like it a lot, especially if there is garlic in the mixture.  In this recipe, one slices cabbage into rounds, drizzles olive oil over the “steak,” adds salt and pepper and whatever else one wants, and roasts in a 350º oven for something like 40 to 45 minutes.  The edges of the “steak” will get brown, as will the bottom.  (I cover the pan with parchment paper as I long ago stopped using toxic aluminum foil around food.)  Thicker steaks might take longer.  One that is about 1/2 inches or a bit bigger is about right.  The thicker the “steak,” the longer it takes to get that caramelized sweetness roasting can bring.

Here’s what the “steak” looks like on a plate alongside fresh peppers and carrots and some roasted haddock:

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Yumminess!

Written by louisaenright

January 30, 2017 at 11:28 am

Interesting Information: Honey and Cancer: Sustainable Inverse Relationship Particularly for Developing Nations

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Interesting Information:  January 30, 2017

Honey and Cancer:  Sustainable Inverse Relationship

DIL Tami Kelly Enright is the director of The Bee Cause, which seeks to sustain bees via educating people about bees.  By placing hives in public places (schools, stores, parks, etc.), people can learn about bees and bees can have a protected place to live.  Whole Foods has been a big supporter.  And the whole project was initially started and funded by The Savannah Bee Company in Savannah, Georgia.  Tami has won a number of major funding grants along the way.

Anyway, Tami sent me this study, which shows an inverse relationship between honey and cancer prevention.

Source: Honey and Cancer: Sustainable Inverse Relationship Particularly for Developing Nations—A Review

Written by louisaenright

January 30, 2017 at 11:18 am

Turkey Tracks: Sew Sweetness Aeroplane Bag

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Turkey Tracks:  January 21, 2017

Sew Sweetness “Aeroplane” Bag

I love this bag!!

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The top is pieced in the “Becca Babb-Brott” style.  Becca helped me a lot as this bag was a huge learning curve for me.  I love, also, the way the charcoal shot cotton fabric looks for the bottom and the straps.

I had to put the top zipper in THREE TIMES before I got it right.  Oh my!!  Don’t even ask…why…  Dense seamstress who has not put in zippers in probably 30 years or more.  AND what I think is a kind of misdirection about how to handle the ends of the zippers in the pattern.  Probably everyone else who sews in the world “got” what to do or not do according to the type of zipper one had, but not me…

I also learned with this top zipper that one has to sew a generous quarter of an inch on the first basting in of the zipper or the inner lining will not come up far enough to be caught when one does the final top stitching.

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BUT, I loved the way the inside zippers and red pockets came out.  Those I mastered right away.

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Can’t wait to use this bag AND I can’t wait to make another one.

The pattern comes in two sizes; I did the LONG bag.

Written by louisaenright

January 21, 2017 at 1:09 pm