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Hand Embroidery Information

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Interesting Information: April 7, 2021

Hand Embroidery Information

At some point in my sewing life, I found embroidery.

But what I found, or did, bears no resemblance to what people are doing now.

How fun is this Aurifil post! So enjoy the eye candy here.

And below find a link to a project Debbie of A Quilter’s Table blog is doing—varied projects designed by Rebecca Ringquist, among them alphabet “dropcloths.”

https://auribuzz.com/2021/04/02/five-for-friday-hand-embroidery/

https://aquilterstable.blogspot.com/

Rebecca Ringquist

And then there is Wild Boho:

https://wildboho.com/

Written by louisaenright

April 7, 2021 at 9:48 am

Bits and Pieces April 5, 2021

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Turkey Tracks: April 5, 2021

Bits and Pieces April 5, 2021

It’s Monday again!

And so the wheel of time turns, as it has a habit of doing.

I got the big long cabin, “Peaceful,” on the long arm. Naming credit goes to Linda McKinney, who told me on day when this quilt was still on the design wall that it made her feel peaceful. And, I’ve started quilting it. I’ll take it easy—a few passes each day. It is a big quilt.

There is so much promise when the design wall is empty.

I pulled out the gifted blocks made by those in the Mt. Battie Modern Quilt Guild group who are participating in our “Bee Sewcial” challenge. My prompt was “Shapes,” and I specified solids and very clear, bright colors. I included a selection of example bright solid colors in my prompt information. Not all of the received blocks are on the board as I ran out of room. And the long arm head is blocking the bottom of the design wall so you can’t see those. To begin, I’ll start combining blocks into bigger blocks—so everything will shrink down somewhat. But aren’t these blocks beautiful! I am loving all the motion that so many of the blocks have—motion from shapes and from color choices.

How fun!

”Trees” now has a name: “Bright Birches.” It is so funny to me how a quilt will name itself at some point. This one didn’t like being called just “Trees.”. Sewing down the binding is coming along.

LOCAL PEEPS: I am replacing the 2012 Toyota Sienna minivan with a smaller car. I love the van. I especially love to drive it on the highway. It is so easy to steer and has a great turning radius. But it is too much car for me for everyday use. So, if you know someone who wants this pristine, one-owner, garaged, VERY low mileage (just under 34K) car at a very reasonable price, let me know. (I did my research and am selling it for $14.2K—which is lower than you’d buy it from a used car dealer, but a bit more than the dealership is offering for it. Dealers make their money on trade resells, not on the new cars.) It can go to a new home when the new car arrives some time this month—which I hope will not be delayed due to the recent Suez Canal blockage of 400+ ships.

The “boyfriend” is not for sale.

Written by louisaenright

April 5, 2021 at 2:13 pm

Cross Stitching: Another Fun Aurifil Blog Post

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Interesting Information: April 4, 2021

Cross Stitching: Another Fun Aurifil Blog Post

Way, way back in the day, when some of my cousins gathered at my Reynolds, Georgia, grandparents‘ home for summer visits, the girl cousins started cross-stitch projects from kits available locally in this small rural town.

Later, as a young married, and occupied with two small children, I returned to making some cross-stitch projects at night. These projects pre-dated getting a sewing machine and beginning to sew garments and, for one Christmas, what were probably my very first quilts. These “bedspreads” were just big squares that were layered and tied. I don’t even remember what I layered them with—but they were really heavy and warm and around and about both Falls Church, Virginia, houses we had for many years.

Cross Stitching, like the quilting I eventually discovered, has “taken off” in terms of complexity. And who knew that Aurifil makes a kind of twisted “floss” that is so pretty—much like the size 8 perle cotton I like.

So, if like me you were not aware of where cross stitching has gone, enjoy the eye candy on this recent Aurifil blog—which contains an interview with “Susan” that features both cross-stitching and some quilts.

There is also a link below the interview to information on the above-mentioned Aurifil “floss” threads—which are just pretty to see.

https://auribuzz.com/2021/04/02/little-quaker-abc/

Written by louisaenright

April 4, 2021 at 8:43 am

Virtual Tour of Nancy Crow’s “Riff” Quilts

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Interesting Information and Quilts: April 2, 2021

Virtual Tour of Nancy Crow’s “Riff” Quilts

I forget now how this information about this exhibit and history of Nancy Crow’s “Riff” quilts came into my social media, but I was immediately drawn to these quilts for several reasons. One is that while I knew Nancy Crow was an early creator of the turn quilting took toward art quilts and innovative “riffs” on traditional quilting back in the day, I had not connected her work to either what we now see often in “modern” quilting or to more recent quilters like Maria Shell, the Alaskan quilter who won a major prize at this year’s Modern Quilt Guild show, Quilt Con. Or, to Tara Faughnan, who is the featured designer in Sewtopia’s online class The Color Collective. Or, to Timna Tarr. And I’m sure there are many more current quilters Nancy Crow has influenced—including all the students working with these clever teachers.

Crow’s “Riff” quilts were on display at the International Quilt Museum in Lincoln, Nebraska, until the end of March 2021.

Crow’s originating idea was started with remembering some railroad tracks from her childhood. Then she went deep with her explorations of those images, and her progression is seen in the way these “Riff” quilts were hung.

Maria Shell has been a student with Nancy Crow. Here is the quilt that made her a top winner at the 2021 Modern Quilt Guild’s Quilt-Con show this year: “Mosh Pit @the Golden” quilt. So you can see where Nancy Crow’s work has influenced and inspired other quilters.

And here’s a link to Maria Shell’s blog where she talks about creating “Mosh Pit”:

https://talesofastitcher.com/2018/02/17/mosh-pit-quilt-riot-stitched-anarchy/

Enjoy!

A Fun Post From the Aurifil Blog

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Interesting Information: March 30, 2021

A Fun Post From The Aurifil Blog

Here’s a fun post from the Aurifil Blog for which I recently signed up and am enjoying.

https://auribuzz.com/2021/03/28/showcase-sunday-3-28/

Written by louisaenright

March 30, 2021 at 7:51 am

Sewing Justice Sewing Academy: Beginnings

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Interesting Information: March 28, 2021

Sewing Justice Sewing Academy: Beginnings

Linda Satkowski sent me this interview article featuring Sara Trail and her formation of the Sewing Justice Sewing Academy (SJSA), and I hunted down the link so I could share it as this story about Sara Trail and the SJSA formation is so interesting.

Aurifil threads is a sponsor of Sara Trail’s Sewing Justice Sewing Academy, and they have a really nice blog. I signed up for it and am getting their interesting and informative posts.

Enjoy!

https://auribuzz.com/2021/03/26/sjsa-beginnings/

Written by louisaenright

March 28, 2021 at 7:53 am

An Orchid Story

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Interesting Information: March 27, 2021

An Orchid Story

AND, here’s another fun story—sent to me by local friend Marsha Smith.

“Our daughter in FL always looks forward to her cattleya orchid blooming every year. She has to time it just right to pick the blooms before the iguanas eat them-Look at the picture and see the iguana coming down the tree to get it as she is cutting it. Think they must smell them. The orchid has grown all over the tree.”

And here’s the beautiful bloom, now saved from the iguana.

Thanks Marsha!

Written by louisaenright

March 27, 2021 at 9:24 am

A True Maine Story

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Turkey Tracks: March 26, 2021

A True Maine Story

Wendy from wendysquilting.wordpress.com sent me this piece of Maine history written by Heather Cox Richardson about 10 days ago now, and I so enjoyed reading it.

I think you will too, especially if you are a Mainer.

The Maine birthday is earlier in the month, but it is still March.

Wendy’s blog is so interesting too. Wendy is a Canadian and lives near the US border on the “other side” of Lake Superior. She is an artist when it comes to her longarm quilting, for sure. And like me, she is a quilter who loves to piece.

Enjoy!

https://heathercoxrichardson.substack.com/p/march-14-2021

Written by louisaenright

March 26, 2021 at 8:26 am

Toaster Warning

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Turkey Tracks: September 21, 2020

Toaster Warning

I can’t eat bread. I think it is the yeast more than the gluten. But who knows? So I’ve been toasting a small corn tortilla and using that like bread or a cracker. I can spread butter or a soft goat cheese on the tortilla or melt some mozzarella cheese on it in the big oven.  (I’m so happy I’ve gotten these two cheeses back recently. And eggs. I think it is the quercetin I’m taking.)

BUT, the other night I almost set the kitchen on fire with a toaster that either malfunctioned or let a corn tortilla catch fire.  

In a split second, the flames were nearly a foot high—I kid you not.  And the toaster was located beneath a kitchen cabinet. I had to unplug the toaster and put it in the sink—flames and all—and douse it REPEATEDLY with water from the sink faucet.  So scary!

To make sure there would be no more drama, I put the toaster outside on the grass when the fire stopped.

No more toasters—and I am so lucky I was just standing in the kitchen when this fire started.  I live out in the country, and there are NO fire hydrants or water beyond whatever a pumper fire truck brings.  My house would have had a serious fire or burned down if I had not been standing right there in the kitchen.

I ordered a toaster oven,  which will come soon.  I think a toaster oven will be a safer choice. And, yes, I have a rule that I never leave the kitchen or that floor of my house when a pot is on the stove.  When I turn off flames under a pot, I move the pot off the burner to make sure the gas is off.  And now I will never again have a toaster in my house again.

And I would suggest that none of you put something in a toaster or a toaster oven and leave the room.  

I have noticed—and written about it here—that today’s toasters and way too many appliances are total junk. I have not been able to find a toaster in our markets that is like the old toasters we used to be able to get. I am old enough now at 75 to make this comparison. I have tried expensive, and I have tried cheap. None of them work well or last. So I truly think this toaster went whacky in some fundamental way. The handle where one pushes to start the heat was “funky” when I started the tortilla.

Believe me, I am saying prayers of blessings and thafter this incident.

Written by louisaenright

September 21, 2020 at 1:22 pm

Outside Grill Drama

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Turkey Tracks: July 3, 2020

Outside Grill Drama

My little Weber Spirit II is 2 years old.

It is the perfect size for me as it will also handle grilled food when family or guests come. It’s not too big or complicated. It is just right.

Last year I had trouble with the propane hookup, and a kind friend came and helped me. Can I just say that I have no experience with gas and that hearing and smelling it escape terrifies me. My friend said the propane tank was bad, took it back to the local store, replaced it, and got me going again.

This spring, when I went to grill a steak, something went really bad, and I could smell gas. I turned everything off immediately and when my heart stopped pounding, I started to research. The bad tank had been replaced. Was it the hook-up from the grill to the tank this time?

The name for the silver round piece behind the black attachment knob is called a “regulator.” They can go bad. I ordered a new one which came in a few days. There are videos that show you how to safely replace the piece from the gold bolts. It looked easy, if one has the right wrenches. Nevertheless I called a Lion friend who very, very sweetly came to help.

My friend swiftly replaced the regulator piece. That was no issue, but something was still wrong. We couldn’t get the black knob in the tank right and then everything froze up. The handle on the tank would not budge so we could remove the tank. In time, the system “unfroze,” and my friend rehooked the tank and tested that the grill burners would light. All seemed to be ok.

The next night, I defrosted my steak, which I froze when trouble started. I turned the handle on the tank to let the gas flow to the grill, and Oh MY God!!! Gas everywhere. I turned everything off, walked away, and, heart pounding again, pan fried my steak in the kitchen.

What to do now?

I went to bed and woke with the idea that I would call the propane tank supplier, which is also my household propane supplier. I talked with a very nice woman who said that they “don’t do grills.” But she said she’d talk to the propane tank manager and would call me back.

She did. She said he said that it was most likely the gasket in the tank and to take it off the grill and if it didn’t stop releasing gas after I disengaged it, to just carry it out into the yard and let it play out. Meanwhile, she would call the local store and tell them to replace the tank for me when I brought it in.

With heart pounding, again I tried to remove the tank, but couldn’t budge the black connector knob. I think it was freezing up, like before, which is a fail-safe safety feature. After several tries throughout the afternoon, I finally got the tank off the grill—and it didn’t leak gas. Yeah, one victory.

I took the tank to the store and got a new one. These tanks are super heavy when full, and I had to get mine up a set of steps, a hill, and more steps to get it to the grill. But, I did.

The hook-up requires the strength to lift the tank on to its hook-up latch which is UNDER the permanent tray at the side. But it all went well. The grill lit just fine. And I’ve had several meals with grilled meat in the past days.

This is a long story. But it is a success story—made possible by nice friends, a nice person at the propane company, nice people at the local store, online research and videos, and some personal determination to sort and solve this problem.

Not bad for a 75-year old widow.

Written by louisaenright

July 3, 2020 at 10:53 am