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Mainely Tipping Points

Archive for January 2017

Turkey Tracks: Cabbage “Steaks”

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Turkey Tracks:  January 30, 2017

Cabbage “Steaks”

I saw a recipe for cabbage “steaks” on Facebook not along ago.

I am one of those people who LOVE all roasted vegetables, so I thought I’d try this one.  I’ve roasted cabbage sliced thin into shreds before and like it a lot, especially if there is garlic in the mixture.  In this recipe, one slices cabbage into rounds, drizzles olive oil over the “steak,” adds salt and pepper and whatever else one wants, and roasts in a 350º oven for something like 40 to 45 minutes.  The edges of the “steak” will get brown, as will the bottom.  (I cover the pan with parchment paper as I long ago stopped using toxic aluminum foil around food.)  Thicker steaks might take longer.  One that is about 1/2 inches or a bit bigger is about right.  The thicker the “steak,” the longer it takes to get that caramelized sweetness roasting can bring.

Here’s what the “steak” looks like on a plate alongside fresh peppers and carrots and some roasted haddock:

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Yumminess!

Written by louisaenright

January 30, 2017 at 11:28 am

Interesting Information: Honey and Cancer: Sustainable Inverse Relationship Particularly for Developing Nations

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Interesting Information:  January 30, 2017

Honey and Cancer:  Sustainable Inverse Relationship

DIL Tami Kelly Enright is the director of The Bee Cause, which seeks to sustain bees via educating people about bees.  By placing hives in public places (schools, stores, parks, etc.), people can learn about bees and bees can have a protected place to live.  Whole Foods has been a big supporter.  And the whole project was initially started and funded by The Savannah Bee Company in Savannah, Georgia.  Tami has won a number of major funding grants along the way.

Anyway, Tami sent me this study, which shows an inverse relationship between honey and cancer prevention.

Source: Honey and Cancer: Sustainable Inverse Relationship Particularly for Developing Nations—A Review

Written by louisaenright

January 30, 2017 at 11:18 am

Turkey Tracks: Sew Sweetness Aeroplane Bag

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Turkey Tracks:  January 21, 2017

Sew Sweetness “Aeroplane” Bag

I love this bag!!

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The top is pieced in the “Becca Babb-Brott” style.  Becca helped me a lot as this bag was a huge learning curve for me.  I love, also, the way the charcoal shot cotton fabric looks for the bottom and the straps.

I had to put the top zipper in THREE TIMES before I got it right.  Oh my!!  Don’t even ask…why…  Dense seamstress who has not put in zippers in probably 30 years or more.  AND what I think is a kind of misdirection about how to handle the ends of the zippers in the pattern.  Probably everyone else who sews in the world “got” what to do or not do according to the type of zipper one had, but not me…

I also learned with this top zipper that one has to sew a generous quarter of an inch on the first basting in of the zipper or the inner lining will not come up far enough to be caught when one does the final top stitching.

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BUT, I loved the way the inside zippers and red pockets came out.  Those I mastered right away.

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Can’t wait to use this bag AND I can’t wait to make another one.

The pattern comes in two sizes; I did the LONG bag.

Written by louisaenright

January 21, 2017 at 1:09 pm

Interesting Information: “Which Milk Is Most Nutritious: Soy, Cashew, Almond or Coconut?”

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Interesting Information:  January 9, 2017

“Which Milk Is Most Nutritious:  Soy, Cashew, Almond or Coconut?”

This article comes from the “Well” section of The New York Times.

The general consensus is that “in terms of nutrients, nut milks pale in comparison to cow’s milk.”

I would add that raw cows milk is a much better choice than commercial cooked milk with added nutrients.  There is a lot of information on raw milk in the Mainely Tipping Points essays on this blog.

One factor considered in the article is the amount of protein available.

Another factor considered is the amount of nutrients that have been added back to a product that has destroyed the original nutrients.  I would also argue that these grocery-store milks are basically fake foods and that if you need to or want to make substitutions for cows milk, learn to make your own alternative milks using real ingredients that you will minimally process.  There are plenty of recipes on-line.  I’ve made coconut milk.  It’s easy.  You buy an organic dried coconut and, basically, pour boiling water over it and let it steep before straining out the coconut bits.

The article points out that the “good” of any of these milks also depends upon the particular manufacturer.  READ LABELS.

I would also NOT touch soy milk.  There is plenty of information on the dangers of improperly processed soy products on this blog.

Source: Which Milk Is Most Nutritious: Soy, Cashew, Almond or Coconut? – The New York Times

Written by louisaenright

January 9, 2017 at 12:16 pm

Turkey Tracks: “Bee Land” Quilt

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Turkey Tracks:  January 9, 2017

“Bee Land” Quilt

I can’t quite believe that I have finished this quilt.

I started it in Charleston, SC, Thanksgiving 2015 as my “take along” project.  I used scraps from my 2 1/2 inch square bin.  It felt more than a little daunting to take on a project this size with so many tiny (1-inch) pieces to make by hand using English Paper Piecing.

I called it “Bee Land,” after finishing the binding a few days ago.

The design is from Edyta Sitar’s “Flower Garden,” which is on the cover of her book HANDFULS OF SCRAPS.

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I did NOT attempt to do Edyta’s amazing applique borders, as you can see.

As a side note, I met Edyta in Houston in October 2014 and saw this quilt in her booth.  It is so gorgeous “in person,” as is Edyta Sitar.  It was a pleasure to meet and talk with her.  I have many of her books and so love her tiny, tiny pieces and exquisite work.

The quilting went so well on this quilt.  Lucy the Longarm behaved beautifully.  And I like the warm old gold thread color I used.  The pantograph is a 12-inch version of “Simple Feathers” by Anne Bright.

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The doll faces look lacy from a distance.

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I had another fabric for the borders, a blue fabric with medallions, but discarded it in favor of the warmer red/orange.  AND, I had TWO other backings, one to go with the blue fabric and another modern fabric that was whimsical.  At the last minute I settled on a more traditional fabric that I had bought in last year’s April “Shop Hop” for 40% off.  It’s perfect for this quilt.

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It is a really good feeling to finish a quilt you have spent a year +++ making.  There were hours of sewing pleasure with this project  It is all done by hand except for the binding and the quilting on Lucy.

I would love to make this quilt again using low-volume fabrics that are very light and bright, whimsical fabrics.

Books, Documentaries, Reviews: EUPHORIA by Lily King

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Books, Documentaries, Reviews:  January 5, 2016

EUPHORIA by Lily King

I recently listened to Lily King’s novel EUPHORIA, downloaded from the Maine library system.

This novel was listed among the years ten best in 2014 by The New York Times.

I really enjoyed this novel, which is somewhat based on an episode in the life of Margaret Mead, but which is so much more.  King captures in the novel competing views on how one goes about practicing anthropology, something that is developing and changing anthropology in Mead’s time.  What is at stake is the recognition of what can actually be learned from explorations into foreign cultures.  The novel also asks what those cultures might learn about the anthropologists and their western culture.  Thus, peripheral, but present in the novel, is also the impact western explorers have on previously “undiscovered” cultures.

The novel is dynamic and the story moves forward in good time.  It can be read at the surface level of romance in an exotic place, but, as I said above, King is after more than that surface level.

Here’s The New York Times book review.  I have dropped in a quote from the review:

In “Euphoria,” the novelist Lily King has taken the known details of that occasion — a 1933 field trip to the Sepik River, in New Guinea, during which Mead and her second husband, Reo Fortune, briefly collaborated with the man who would become her third husband, the English anthropologist Gregory Bateson — and blended them into a story of her own devising. The result is as uncanny as it is transporting. “Euphoria” is a meticulously researched homage to Mead’s restless mind and a considered portrait of Western anthropology in its primitivist heyday. It’s also a taut, witty, fiercely intelligent tale of competing egos and desires in a landscape of exotic menace — a love triangle in extremis.

Written by louisaenright

January 5, 2017 at 1:40 pm

Turkey Tracks: The Reveal of Bonnie Hunter’s “En Provence”

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Turkey Tracks:  January 4, 2016

The Reveal of Bonnie Hunter’s “En Provence”

I finished the last clue last night.

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And, now THIS…

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…is going to turn into THIS!!

 

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The above is Bonnie Hunter’s computer rendering of “En Provence.”

You can see her real version at quiltville.com–on the blog.

I have the Farmer’s Wife blocks on the design wall, and I think I’ve finished moving them around now.  I will sew those blocks into a quilt top before starting turning all the “clues” into a quilt top.

Written by louisaenright

January 5, 2017 at 1:24 pm