A Rainy Day

Turkey Tracks: April 9, 2022

A Rainy Day

It poured rain all day yesterday. All day.

It was the kind of heavy rain where flooding happens, and the intermittent creek on the woods side of my house was ”booking” all day.

I hunkered down and made do with food I had on hand and just enjoyed the peacefulness of a rainy day.

AC, who hates rainy days, was ever hopeful that I would play with him with his ball.

To amuse him, I cut his toenails, which he HATES, and cleaned his teeth, which he LOVES. I clean his teeth with some double-wrapped gauze that I put over my finger and rub on his teeth. Then I used the Furminator on his coat. I have not “Furminatored” him in about a month—and he is starting to shed his winter coat. Using this tool weekly really helps the dog-hair-in-the-house problem.

Good Heavens! I had to get out the vacuum to clean up the rug and me when I was done. The Furminator excels in getting out the loose undercoat in a dog. For AC, I got the short-hair medium-size dog version—and I highly recommend this tool as it has made a big difference in the amount of dog hair in my house.

I also spent some time looking at John Steele’s web site. John is a retired pharmacist from Utah, and he is a wildlife photographer. I met him at the Snow Bowl field as he takes his two older dogs there to walk, and one of them, Miss Daisy, loves to chase AC’s ball with AC. Miss Daisy is the black dog in this screenshot of a photo John took of Daisy and Jamie jumping from the float into Hosmer Pond—which I took from his web site: johnsteelephotography.com

John’s web site also has some beautiful and interesting pictures of mustangs out west. He’s currently working on a photography book that he hopes will educate more people about these horses. And there are really nice photos of Maine and Maine wildlife—and more photos of these two dogs who love to swim.

Enjoy!

Today is sunny, so AC and I will be out and about to make up for the rainy day yesterday.

The grass is…GROWING…and turning quite green. The lawn crew that helps me is coming next Wednesday to take up the wooden, winter snow boardwalk and to help me with some of the needed spring clean-up. And AC has not heard any flying squirrels in the house for about a week now.

Cassandra’s Interesting Blog Post

Turkey Tracks: March 25, 2022

Cassandra’s Interesting Blog Post

Cassandra’s blog, The Not So Dramatic Life, often has interesting posts.

This post takes a close look at 5 modern quilts from this year’s QuiltCon that she especially liked, along with analysis about what it was that she liked.

Taking a Closer Look: 5 Quilts from QuiltCon

Here’s a screenshot of her recent blog offerings to give you an idea—she has been looking closely at different categories of quilts shown at this year’s QuiltCon.

Twenty Curved Quilts From Quilt Con 2022

Interesting Information: March 18, 2022

Twenty Curved Quilts From Quilt Con 2022

Cassandra Beaver posted a blog entry featuring 20 curved quilts at this year’s Quilt Con.

They are, of course, awesome.

Cassandra Beaver’s blog is awesome too.

She thinks we should all be making more curves in quilts this coming year.

Trending: Quilts with Curves at QuiltCon

Enjoy!

PS: local peeps—one of the quilts shown was made by Amy Friend, who has taught several workshops for us over the years.

A Quick Tip: How to Get Fresh Blueberry Stains Out of Fabric

Interesting Information: March 6, 2022

A Quick Tip: How to Get Fresh Blueberry Stains Out of Fabric

It’s so easy…

Just pour boiling water through the stain: out it comes.

Note that treating a blueberry stain with one of the stain removers can actually set it. Because…it has something to do with the acid content of either the berry or the cleanier.

Tucker Came to Visit AC

Turkey Tracks: February 19, 2022

Tucker Came to Visit AC

My friend came for a visit, bringing Tucker doggie with her.

It was his second visit here.

He was still wary of this new situation, as a tiny, delicate doggie should be, especially when faced with a bigger dog.

Tucker is VERY vocal, as his owner demonstrates.

The other day, LIz and I walked a local, quiet street, and the two dogs recognized each other and went trotting happily along, both enjoying the outing. AC had a doggie grin the whole time.

Today it is snowing and will snow all day. I’m going to enjoy this gift of a snow day.

One of the baby quilts is on the longarm—so that is the task for today.

My Supplements and Health Helpers

Turkey Tracks and Interesting Information: February 22, 2022

My Supplements and Health Helpers

I hesitated to share the information in this post for some time, but I’m going to share it today.

I will be 77 in mid-March, and except for the mast cell disorder with its histamine intolerance reactions, over which I have likely had no control in terms of how it started, I am really healthy. I don’t take any Big Pharma medicines, I eat a very healthy and clean diet and cook for myself, and I’ve done a pretty good job of eliminating stress from my life. I am physically pretty active: I help clean my house, I do most of my own garden work and all the mowing on this challenging property I own, and in good weather, I do daily outdoor events with AC doggie.

So, I thought I’d share my health practices.

I currently take these supplements. Mercola’s products ARE more expensive, but they are clean (no magnesium sterate fillers which can eliminate one’s uptake of needed nutrients) and are made from clean ingredients found in nature and not chemical concoctions in labs. What is not pictured here is the melatonin I take at night—not so much to sleep, but because I’ve read numerous studies from mainstream medicine now that melatonin is a really good supplement to prevent and/or manage the covid virus.

Most of this collection of supplements is recommended to help prevent illnesses, including covid. Some are specific to me—see below.

Too many Americans are deficient in magnesium and vitamin D3. And, Zinc. So those three are important. I can’t take Zinc; it makes me throw up, and the Quercetin helps balance mast cell reactions to triggers and is a stand-in for Zinc. I added iodine recently because I was not sure, with my diet, that I was getting enough. I do have added energy these days, so adding iodine has been good I think. Vitamin C, especially in winter, is an important addition—and one that helps the immune system. I can’t eat citrus, so I take the C except for summer—though I read recently that red bell peppers have more vitamin C than some fruits. I eat a lot of salt combined with herbs as I can’t do most spices—and salt washes potassium out of one’s system, especially, apparently mine, as I’ve turned up deficient during one trip to the hospital when I passed out. If I have leg cramps, I now know that the balance between potassium and magnesium is ”off.” Usually adding potassium fixes that, but sometimes more magnesium is needed. Too much magnesium can cause diarrhea, so that can be a delicate balance. Human bodies are so much more complicated than many realize I think.

I have worked with a local homeopath for 15+ years now. She keeps me healthy and has corrected a lot of constitutional problems I have, like the poison ivy that would systemically go all over my body and would cause great weeping patches of oozing sores until stopped with a steroid. I don’t get poison ivy any more. And I have not had a cold in well over a decade now.

My homeopath has been using these plant-based tinctures for several years now—and she changes them up for me as needed. One takes just a few drops a day. During the past two covid years, this is what I have been taking: Blackthorn and Sea Buckthorn are the anti-virals, among other immune system boosters; Hazel helps the liver and lungs and resolves inflammation; olive helps the cardiovascular system and also helps with any inflammation.

Here’s a quote about these gemmotherapies: ”Vital Extract is the gemmotherapy line produced exclusively for Lauren Hubele, LLC by Plant Extrakt of Cluj, Romania, Europe’s leading production facility for homeopathy and gemmotherapy. Vital Extract Gemmotherapy is backed by the most extensive and most current research in Europe and offers the widest selection of products available in America.”

The back story is that Romania couldn’t afford a western-democracy style of medicine so developed these products for their citizens. And the claim is that they are working well.

https://store.laurenhubele.com/pages/about

My homeopath also uses traditional homopathic remedies. I have a medicine kit of these remedies, so if I have an issue after talking to my homeopath, they are immediately available to me. I also have many, many packets of remedies my homeopath has provided that are not in this kit. Some target the histamine issues I have.

If you buy remedies in a local store, you would look for the blue container shown at the bottom of the picture. Arnica Montana is a vital remedy to have on hand for any time you have an injury. It works wonders to prevent bleeding and bruising.

Here’s what the remedies look like—3 of them are a dose. Don’t touch then with your fingers as that can put skin oil on them that might slow them down. If there is an acute problem, like an injury, you would repeat doses in short intervals of something like 15 minutes. But, except for Arnica probably, here’s where you need help from a homeopath. And, if you live in a state that does not allow them, know that you can find a good homeopath and work with them via zoom meetings.

In recent years I have added Young Living Essential oil products—and I have a membership with them so I can order at reduced prices. I have gradually switched to their cleaning, hand soap, shampoo, and lipstick products as well. If you are interested, there will be someone near you who sells them. I am not interested in starting a business, but I will order products for my friends at the prices I get.

All this winter, I’ve kept this little bottle of oregano on my kitchen window sill. If I wake up feeling ”stuffy,” one sniff clears my entire head and throat in short order. Oregano is a ”hot” oil, so be careful and don’t sniff too hard or you’ll feel like your nose is burning. Go gently. Ditto the peppermint oil that I love so much. I read somewhere that Oregano oil can kill pathogens in your nose and throat. I don’t know. I just know when I use it, all stuffiness goes away immediately for the entire rest of the day.

Here’s a view of a cabinet in my kitchen. I keep lavender very nearby as if I burn myself, it can stop the burning pain immediately. Copaiba is also good for injuries. Longevity is for AC doggie—there are claims it keeps ticks and fleas away. I can’t eat citrus, but I can use the citrus oils sparingly to flavor foods without problems it seems. They are especially lovely, for me, added to olive oil for a salad and soups/stews. They carry a big punch of flavor. The Vitality line is meant to be orally used—like adding drops of lemon oil to water as a treat.

I also use a cold diffuser for these oils and now have one in the kitchen and one downstairs. They eliminate cooking and doggie and just stale-air odors all over the house. There are claims made that many of the oils are medicinal and cleansing as well. I don’t doubt it.

Here’s my desk cabinet with oils I particularly like in the upstairs diffuser. The downstairs one has different needs, but I have a cabinet of beloved oils down there too.

I do know that the tree oils ARE medicinal and have been used by native people for centuries as healing compounds. One can mix these oils in a diffuser, like using 3 of the tree oils. Or, something like lavender and lemon. The possibilities are endless.

I also use wool dryer balls in my clothes dryer, and I often sprinkle a favorite oil on a few of them to make my clothes smell extra special. Smelling oils also puts them into your body where they can do their good work.

This whole journey is definitely one sparked by living in (mostly) rural Maine—where I am close to the earth, small farms, clean food, the Maine forest, and people who are making this journey with me. I didn’t acquire all of these products overnight. It took two decades.

I am so grateful for this time I’ve had in Maine.

Para-Gliding Fun!

Turkey Tracks/Interesting Information: July 15, 2021

Para-Gliding Fun!

I did not know this sport existed until I saw it at the Snow Bowl athletic field a few days ago.

I was entranced!

There were TWO gliders WAY UP HIGH and coming from the mountains. I could not get in place to get a picture of the first one to land (a man), but here are videos of the second one (a woman) positioning to come in for a beautiful landing.

More positioning—a banking to get in position to land.

And the—very soft and gentle—landing. And you can see the first paraglider on the ground with his “wings” in his arms.

I’ve seen this kind of sport over water, where one is pulled by a boat. But I had no idea this sport existed.

Here’s where I wish I was 20 years younger, because flying is in my blood, and I’d be up there in that sky. For sure.

Maine “Coon” Cats

Interesting Information/Turkey Tracks: July 7, 2021

Maine “Coon” Cats

Here’s Rocky again!

He’s helping Marsha Smith get rid of “stuff” in her house.

Below is an interesting link to information about these amazing cats from Dr. Becker, a veterinarian. No one knows the origin of these cats, but perhaps the “Coon” name derives from a man who had these cats very early on in Maine seafaring history, British sea Captain Charles Coon. There are other origin possibilities though.

These cats are very different cats. For one thing, they like to swim and like water. Some call them the “dog of the cat world.” They are the biggest of the domesticated cats. They don’t really meow, but chirp and trill instead.

In any case, Rocky cat is an amazing creature.

Bees and More Bees

Interesting Information: July 6, 2021

Bees and More Bees

Yesterday, after two days of rain, I took AC to the athletic field at the Snow Bowl for a good run and a swim

As he chased his ball, I began to notice that bees were all over the clover blooming in the field.

At first, my eyes didn’t “see” how many there were:

And then I realized there were hundreds of bees everywhere—big bumblers and little honey bees.

The blooming clover was drawing them, yes, but I think they might have not been able to harvest pollen during the two days of rain.

I zoomed with the phone camera and got a better video of at least one bee.

But even this video does not capture how many there were.

AC was oblivious. But I slowly backed off the field, watching where I was stepping, and I took him swimming instead.

And I was reminded how we went barefoot most of the time when I was a child, and how stepping on a bee in the clover almost always meant a bee sting.