Louisa Enright's Blog

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Turkey Tracks: Summer Salad

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Turkey Tracks:  September 3, 2013

Summer Salad

 

August is not a great month for tender leaf lettuce.  It’s not a great month for any lettuce for that matter.  It’s too hot.  This year has been a bit different–with all the coolness and rain, some of the leaf lettuce has survived.

The wonderful Melody Pendleton came and bailed me out with painting tasks–which I hate and which she likes to do.  She does such beautiful work.  She brought me this gorgeous lettuce from her garden one day.  (I’ve replanted and my new crop is coming along.)

I made a gorgeous salad with her lettuce one day for lunch.  I’ve been so hungry for sautéed zucchini all summer.  So I sautéed some for this salad–and broke a fresh, soy-free egg into it at the end.  I didn’t add cheese as to the pan as I had some fresh goat cheese.  The last of the grated carrot/kohlrabi/corn/mustardy and garlicky dressing went on the side.  And, some of the Sun Gold cherry tomatoes from the garden.  And I had a very quick feast.  Thanks to Melody!  And the garden and the earth and the summer…

 

 

Summer salad

The garden is steadily producing.  Here’s a morning’s offering:

Garden haul

And look at the cherry tomatoes I’ve amassed.  I have enough to start a flat to dehydrate, though I’ll let them get a little riper on the counter first:

Summer Kitchen Counter, Aug. 2013

See those saladette tomatoes at the back of the cherries?  I got those from Hope’s Edge CSA.  And Melody brought me some, too.  They are TERRIFIC roasted in the agro/dolce style.  I learned that from Skye Gyngell’s book A Year in My Kitchen.  Skye takes the notion of having “assets” around the kitchen to whole new levels.  Thanks to Tara Derr Webb, of the Farmbar and Deux Peuces Farm in Charleston, SC, and Awendaw, SC, I have this book in my kitchen.

A Year in my Kitchen

Here’s a very bad picture of the saladettes roasted.  Agro-dolce means sweet/salty.  So, basically, you sprinkle a bit of sugar, a bit of salt, grind over some pepper, and SLOW, SLOW roast at your oven’s lowest heat–which can take 3 or so hours.  OK, if you get in a hurry, you can roast them quicker, and they are still delicious.  They’re good hot or cold.  Rose Thomas, La Dolce Vita Farm, roasts these guys in her wood-fired oven, and oh my gosh–the smoky taste from the wood fire is heavenly.  I’m planting more of these guys next year.

 

Roasted Saladette Tomatoes

With all the vegetables needing to be used, I made a “deep summer soup” one day.  I had some frozen bone broth as a base, so I just sautéed veggies and lots of garlic–some ginger as I had a Bok Choy cabbage–and added some dehydrated mushrooms from a year or two ago.  I threw a handful or two of short-grain brown rice into it as well.  Once it’s cooked, or reheated, I spoon some of my sauerkraut into it and add a dollap of fermented piima cream.  It’s delicious and so good for you with the rich bone broth as a base.

Deep summer soup

I know summer is over, but I can still feel the summer love.

Turkey Tracks: Pie Pumpkins and Pie

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Turkey Tracks:  November 13, 2011

Pie Pumpkins and Pie

The best pie pumpkins are long–like a huge salami.  They’re dark green that starts to turn orange in patches–they turn orange when you cook them.

I usually get one from our CSA, Hope’s Edge.  And I buy a few more, roast them, and freeze the meat–for winter pies.  Organic, of course.

Just slice the pumpkins in half, scoop out the seeds, put them on a shallow pan that has some sides–the roasting pumpkins can give off juice–and roast them for at least an hour at 350 degrees.  You’ll know when they are done–they’ll smell delicious and will fork easily.  Let them cool, scoop out the meat, and freeze or make a pie.

It takes about 2 cups of pumpkin to make a 9 or 10-inch pie.  Each of these halves makes about two cups.  Convenient, huh?

My favorite recipe comes from NOURISHING TRADITIONS, by Sally Fallon and Dr. Mary Enig.

Start with a flakey pie crust of your choice.  (Use butter or really good lard–not any of those fake fats like vegetable lards or margarine.)

2 cups pumpkin

3 eggs–if small, use 4 eggs

3/4 cups rapadura–which is dried cane juice.  I also use organic sugar.  The rapadura has a stronger taste, but the pumpkin can take it.

1 tablespoon fresh grated ginger

1 teaspoon cinnamon

1/4 teaspoon each salt, powdered cloves, nutmeg

grated rind of lemon

1 cup piima cream, or creme fraiche–piima is a cultured cream.  You could also use sour cream.

2 tablespoons brandy

Mix everything together well, pour into your pie shell, and bake at 350 degrees for 35-45 minutes.  The time will depend on the size of your eggs and the liquid in your pumpkin.  I used 3 small eggs, and the pie took more like an hour to puff in the middle.  If it takes longer, cover the  pie with some parchment paper to prevent burning.  (Don’t use aluminum foil!  For anything!!)

 This pie is as light as a feather and absolutely delicious.

Serve with REAL whipped cream.