Louisa Enright's Blog

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Posts Tagged ‘Deux Peuces Farm

Interesting Information: Tara Derr Web makes FOOD AND WINE MAGAZINE

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Interesting Information:  July 23, 2014

Tara Derr Web makes FOOD AND WINE MAGAZINE

 

Oh yes, we are all very proud.

It’s a beautiful spread.

Take a look?

press – thefarmbar.

Written by louisaenright

July 23, 2014 at 2:36 pm

Turkey Tracks: I’m in Charleston

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anTurkey Tracks:  May 27, 2014

 

I’m In Charleston

 

Hello Everyone,

 

I’m in Charleston–and will be for the next two weeks.

I’m visiting my two sons, who live two blocks from each other on Isle of Palms–which is just north of Charleston harbor.  AND, I’m staring my visit with my old young friend Tara Derr Webb and her husband Leighton Webb of Awendaw, SC.  They are the owners of the Farmbar project (farm to table food and the products of the most amazing farms and fiber makers) and of Deux Peuces Farm (two fleas–they are the two fleas).  Tara falls in age between my two sons, so I’ve known her almost as long as I’ve known them–minus a decade maybe.

Tara and I are working on her farm–there will be a workshop later today to make lacto-fermented foods and to teach others from the Farmbar community to make them.   And we are off in a minute to round up the food for the workshop.  I came prepared with books (Sandor Ellis Katz’s WILD FERMENTATION, for one) and a handout that includes gut health issues and information about The Weston A. Price Foundation.

This morning we shared this page from Thich Nhat Hanh’s HOW TO SIT:

DOING LESS

Many of us keep trying to do more and more.  We do things because we want to make money, accomplish something, take care of others, or make our lives and our world better.  Often we do things without thinking, because we are in the habit of doing them, because someone asks us to, or because we think we should.  But if the foundation of our being is not strong enough, then the more we do, the more troubled our society becomes.

Sometimes we do a lot, but we don’t really do anything.  There are many people who work a lot.  There are people who seem to meditate a lot, spending many hours a day doing sitting meditation, chanting, reciting, lighting a lot of incense, but who never transform their anger, frustration, and jealousy.  This is because the quality of our being is the basis of all our actions.  With an attitude of accomplishing, judging, or grasping, all of our actions–even our meditation–will have that quality.  The quality of our presence is the most positive element that we can contribute to the world.

Here’s a not-so-great picture of Tara on her porch this morning–in between chores.  I will take pictures while I am here for later–the ipad isn’t so great for the blog.

 

image

 

Turkey Tracks: “Earth” Quilt

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Turkey Tracks:  December 20, 2013

“Earth” Quilt

This picture is not the greatest picture I could have taken of this big, bold-hearted quilt.

It’s hard to get a good overall picture without two people to hold a big one like this aloft somewhere.

Earth 2

I hand-sewed about 2/3s of these blocks this past summer–which are known as Winding Ways or Wheel of Mystery blocks.  Then I discovered that they sew really well on the machine as well as the curves are not extreme.  It’s easy to cut four layers of fabric with the templates I have (you can order the set online–John Flynn makes one) and with a SMALLER rotary cutter–like the 45mm.

The dark/light blocks form big circles on the quilt–which I really love.  And I really love all the geometric shapes that show up as well.

Earth block

I put in bits of the blue you see–and those bits show up like little polka dots.  Or, pools of water scattered across the earth.  They sparkle across the quilt top’s surface.

It takes a “deep” stash–many fabrics collected for many years–to make a scrappy quilt like this one.

I pieced the backing–and like the way it came out:

Earth backing

I had the dark brown/teal print in the pile of fabric I used in this quilt.  And I cut 10 1/2-inch blocks from other pieces to make rows on the back–an idea which came from Bonnie Hunter’s books.  I also put in some random blocks left over from the front of the quilt.

I really like the border–which is vintage Bonnie Hunter:

Earth border with back

Here’s another view:

Earth border and binding

And I quilted overall with a feathery pantograph pattern I’ve used many times now:  “Simple Feathers” by Anne Bright.  (I love her patterns.)

There is a lot of work, love, healing, and emotion in this quilt–more than most I do.   Here’s the label.  (The saying came from Bonnie Hunter’s web site quiltville.com.)

Earth label

This quilt was delivered TODAY to Tara Derr Webb, whose age fits between my two sons.  I have known her and loved her and worried with her and rejoiced with her since she was eight or nine years old.  Today is the day that Tara is cooking out of “the Farmbar” for the first time in Charleston, SC, where she and her husband Leighton own and operate a developing farm.  Tara is also a photographer, and you can see her work and pictures of Deux Peuces Farm (two fleas) and the Spartan trailer that is “the farmbar” on her web site:  www.thefarmbar26.com.

Turkey Tracks: Summer Salad

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Turkey Tracks:  September 3, 2013

Summer Salad

 

August is not a great month for tender leaf lettuce.  It’s not a great month for any lettuce for that matter.  It’s too hot.  This year has been a bit different–with all the coolness and rain, some of the leaf lettuce has survived.

The wonderful Melody Pendleton came and bailed me out with painting tasks–which I hate and which she likes to do.  She does such beautiful work.  She brought me this gorgeous lettuce from her garden one day.  (I’ve replanted and my new crop is coming along.)

I made a gorgeous salad with her lettuce one day for lunch.  I’ve been so hungry for sautéed zucchini all summer.  So I sautéed some for this salad–and broke a fresh, soy-free egg into it at the end.  I didn’t add cheese as to the pan as I had some fresh goat cheese.  The last of the grated carrot/kohlrabi/corn/mustardy and garlicky dressing went on the side.  And, some of the Sun Gold cherry tomatoes from the garden.  And I had a very quick feast.  Thanks to Melody!  And the garden and the earth and the summer…

 

 

Summer salad

The garden is steadily producing.  Here’s a morning’s offering:

Garden haul

And look at the cherry tomatoes I’ve amassed.  I have enough to start a flat to dehydrate, though I’ll let them get a little riper on the counter first:

Summer Kitchen Counter, Aug. 2013

See those saladette tomatoes at the back of the cherries?  I got those from Hope’s Edge CSA.  And Melody brought me some, too.  They are TERRIFIC roasted in the agro/dolce style.  I learned that from Skye Gyngell’s book A Year in My Kitchen.  Skye takes the notion of having “assets” around the kitchen to whole new levels.  Thanks to Tara Derr Webb, of the Farmbar and Deux Peuces Farm in Charleston, SC, and Awendaw, SC, I have this book in my kitchen.

A Year in my Kitchen

Here’s a very bad picture of the saladettes roasted.  Agro-dolce means sweet/salty.  So, basically, you sprinkle a bit of sugar, a bit of salt, grind over some pepper, and SLOW, SLOW roast at your oven’s lowest heat–which can take 3 or so hours.  OK, if you get in a hurry, you can roast them quicker, and they are still delicious.  They’re good hot or cold.  Rose Thomas, La Dolce Vita Farm, roasts these guys in her wood-fired oven, and oh my gosh–the smoky taste from the wood fire is heavenly.  I’m planting more of these guys next year.

 

Roasted Saladette Tomatoes

With all the vegetables needing to be used, I made a “deep summer soup” one day.  I had some frozen bone broth as a base, so I just sautéed veggies and lots of garlic–some ginger as I had a Bok Choy cabbage–and added some dehydrated mushrooms from a year or two ago.  I threw a handful or two of short-grain brown rice into it as well.  Once it’s cooked, or reheated, I spoon some of my sauerkraut into it and add a dollap of fermented piima cream.  It’s delicious and so good for you with the rich bone broth as a base.

Deep summer soup

I know summer is over, but I can still feel the summer love.

Interesting Information: Homing Bees

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Interesting Information:  April 2, 2013

Homing Bees

Old friends Leighton and Tara Derr Web are working with bee master Tamara Kelly Enright (my daughter-in-law) to start ten hives on Deux Peuces Farm in Awendaw, SC.

Leighton oversaw the building of the ten hives.  Here’s Tami trying her hand at cutting some of the hive wood:

And here are Tami and Leighton “homing” the 50,000 bees in the ten hives.  Tami is setting up a hive by installing the pieces which the bees will use to build the interior of the hive.  I presume Tara is the photographer.

Tami’s honey is called “Talula Bee Honey,” and it is highly prized in the Charleston, SC, area.

And you can see much more information about Tara and Leighton and their farm on THE FARMBAR web site, which is linked on this blog.  See the right sidebar to click over to The Farmbar.  There are some gorgeous articles and pictures on The Press section of Tara’s blog.

Written by louisaenright

April 2, 2013 at 7:46 pm