Louisa Enright's Blog

Mainely Tipping Points

Posts Tagged ‘Stephen Pennoyer

Turkey Tracks: New Bookcase

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Turkey Tracks:  April 3, 2017

New Bookcase

I had an old bookcase in the office/bedroom that literally fell apart a few weeks back.

I heard a crash and when I investigated, found two shelves had collapsed.  This bookcase was one of those cheap things that has paper insides.  It just could not stand up to the summer humidity on this floor and the weight of my quilt books.

I called friend Stephen Pennoyer, master carpenter.  He has helped me so, so, so many times with a property/household problem.

He came immediately on a Thursday, took measurements, and returned on Monday with a SOLID WOOD PAINTED BOOKCASE.

BOY AM I LUCKY!!!

I culled old quilt books in the process and recycled some old magazines in the process.

The best of all possible worlds.

Stephen swears this bookcase will not fall apart.  He guaranteed it for life too.

Written by louisaenright

April 3, 2017 at 10:46 am

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Turkey Tracks: Sister Sue Visits and Fingerless Mittens

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Turkey Tracks:  October 22, 2015

Sister Sue Visits and Fingerless Mittens

It’s been busy, busy here.

Sister Susan came for a visit to see the fall leaves and me–the trees are still turning and are very late this year.  But many were beautiful while Sue was here.

While Sue was here, the old oven went out (the back door had to be removed and the old oven dismantled in the kitchen), and the new oven went in.

Sue brought good luck:  this stove event went flawlessly thanks to carpenter and friend Stephen Pennoyer (who came today to install the new stainless steel backsplash), the installation crew from Kelsey’s Appliance, and Linda McKinny, who cleaned where the old stove had been.  The new stove came in with a half-inch leeway!

We walked every day.  The girl dogs were in doggie heaven.

There was a cold snap one day, and we bundled up–which meant I could use the hand-knit fingerless mittens Stephen’s mother Mary Sue Bishop made for me.  (Mary is one of my oldest friends here in Camden.)

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Don’t they go nicely with my new light LLBean coat and the winter hair band Bonnie Sinatro made for me last year.

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Mary Sue Bishop takes orders for the gloves and uses all sorts of wonderful yarns.  And Bonnie is a fellow Bellevue High School (Offutt AFB) 1963 classmate and terrific email friend.

Here’s Sue at Camden Deli for a cup of coffee after our cold-snap walk:

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And here’s our view of the Camden Harbor at dusk.  We’re at the point where the river comes under these buildings and spills in to the harbor.  The windjammers are getting their plastic winter cocoons these days, and the harbor is slowly emptying out.

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Turkey Tracks: Camden Clothesline Laundromat

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Turkey Tracks:  August 25, 2015

Camden Clothesline Laundromat

I’m not quite sure where this day has gotten to.

I did sleep later than usual.  I don’t sleep well in humid hot weather.  Neither do the dogs.  By the time I got up, the sheets felt like they had been dragged through the fog outside my windows.

It’s rained or been foggy and hot/humid for days and days now.  The grass has gone almost two weeks without being cut.  Mercy!  Will my little electric motor do the job when it finally dries out???  One can’t cut wet grass with an electric mower for sure.

About the time I had finished feeding the dogs, the top layer of the in-counter revolving shelves collapsed down on the tops of the things stored on the second level.  OK, I thought.  I’m going to have my tea and think this over.  Kraft Maid has a help line, and I located that.  But what if what I needed was just a simple tightening of whatever holds up the top shelf.  I called Stephen Pennoyer (who is beyond wonderful) who happened to be in Home Depot–which carries Kraft Maid.  He said he’d call back after talking to the cabinet folks, but within 30 minutes he was on my door step and five minutes after that had tightened the screw that holds the top shelf in place.  My goodness!!!  I am so, so lucky to have Stephen in my life.  He is a caring, kind, generous young man.

Next, I thought I’d go to the laundromat and do my weekly wash, including the damp sheets.

I’ve been without a washing machine since mid July.  First there was a part to be ordered, then it came, then it got installed, then it didn’t work the morning after.  That was about the time that John Park started to put a new roof on his house and so would not be able to come for another two weeks.  He comes this Thursday!!  And I’m betting the part is bad, so I thought I’d get ahead of the curve and not let the wash back up until the weekend.  (John Park is also wonderful, and I’m so happy he, too, is in my life.  I’ll never forget his helping me carry food down two flights of stairs and out to the garage when the kitchen frig went belly up one early evening.)

Camden Clothesline is totally automated, clean, nice, efficient, and it’s kind of funky fun to go there.  Likely I’ll continue to take heavy bed spreads there from now on as there is a BIG washer that can handle more than one spread at a time.  Running multiple loads is just so much faster, and the big dryers are amazing.  They’ll dry a lighter load in 18 minutes

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This automatic door REALLY helps when you’re hauling heavy baskets of clothes up these stairs:

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Washers:  they are the size of my front loader at home.  But it washes for 47 minutes on normal.  These machines wash for about 27 minutes.  I think I have better rinse cycles at home.  And the longer “tumbling” time cleans better.  But…

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Dryers–all the machines can be operated with a credit card.  See the swipe pad?  Plunking in $3.00 worth of quarters can take a long time.

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Dogs waiting in car, but so happy to be able to “go” as it was cloudy and a bit cooler:

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Now my Frigadaire RANT!

My Frigadiare Affinity is THREE YEARS OLD.

The entire electronics package that runs everything is secured to the machine WITH ONE BOLT and located FIVE INCHES from the drum.

Front loaders rev up and jiggle A LOT.  ONE BOLT IS NOT GOING TO HOLD THAT PACKAGE FOR LONG.

Of course it flew off and hit the outside of the drum and smashed.

The warranty is ONLY FOR ONE YEAR.

Folks, this kind of thing is a TOTAL BETRAYAL OF THE CONSUMER.  It is a breach of good faith.  It is planned obsolescence.  It’s deeply, deeply wrong.

Profit goals that don’t take into consideration pride in product and workmanship is producing this problem.

So, if the replacement parts are not going to work, the whole thing is going to wind up in some landfill.

That’s wrong too.

And, unsustainable.

***

Meanwhile, the local store from which I bought this machine, Kelsey’s Appliance, has not returned ONE of my three calls for repair in the past month.  Yet, I’ve bought two major appliances from them and was contemplating a third.  Talk about shooting yourself in the foot.  Guess where I will NOT be shopping again.

End of rant.

And I’ll end by saying that I am so grateful that we have TWO lovely clean laundromats in Camden.  The other is the Queen Bee.

Turkey Tracks: Rose Cooks For the Weekend

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Turkey Tracks:  April 26, 2015

Rose Cooks For the Weekend

Stephen Pennoyer and Mark White moved the chicken coop to Rose Thomas’s La Dolce Vita Farm Saturday morning.

 

 

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It took two trips (bless their souls), but the coop is so happy to be on flat ground once again.  (It’s made by Roots and Coops.)

And see the coop wheels all pumped up?  Stephen got some product you spray inside flat wheels that pumps them up AND coats the inside so that the tire STAYS pumped up.

I came over after I went to the dump–and after Stephen and Mark’s second run–to show Rose the ins and outs of the coop.

Rose bakes and cooks for Saturday morning, and her customer line was slowing down when I came:

Here’s her Facebook post for today–Il Forno (The Oven) at Dolce Vita Farm:

Good Morning Everyone! Today I am opening with fresh hot Bacon and Egg cups, Morning Glory muffins, Hot coffee from Green Tree and loads of fresh breads to include: Pain di mais (sourdough cornbread), Semolina, Whole wheat sourdough, Lt Wheat pecan/raisin, and regular cornbread with corn and bacon. There is also ricotta/cheese cakes with almond biscotti crusts and my fab Oatmeal everything cookie. Todays entree is Seafood Chowdha with shrimp, scallops and haddock.

Have a great day everyone!
Dolce Vita Farm and Bakery
488 Beach Road
Lincolnville, Maine
207-323-1052

Oh my.  You should see Rose’s beautiful food:

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Hot Bacon and Egg cups:

 

 

 

 

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Ricotta cheese cake:

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BIG Morning Glory muffins and very interesting corn cakes:

 

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Here’s Rose with puppy Ivy–whose face looks like a Teddy Bear’s:

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I got a cup of coffee and we walked about.

My chickens are still staying close to each other, and they still recognize my voice.  They also recognized their old coop:

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Pumpkin is VERY happy at Rose’s:

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I’ll be getting these at Rose’s now:

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She’s going to use the coop first to pen Pumpkin with her three remaining Blue Wheaten hens and “Baby” her best broody hen to see if she can get more of this wonderful breed.

I went home with a bacon/egg cup, a quart of DELICIOUS chowder, and two of the corn cakes.

And I’ll be back next Saturday morning for sure.

 

 

Written by louisaenright

April 26, 2015 at 3:57 pm

Turkey Tracks: The Swing Mailbox

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Turkey Tracks:  April 18, 2015

The Swing Mailbox

Remember the blog post from last winter about my smashed mailbox?

Well, it’s now spring, and it’s time to fix the mailbox.

Here’s the very cool solution:  MailSwing

I picked it up yesterday in Pittston, Maine, from Tim Gay.  This business is now going to be a third-generation father/son business.

Stephen Pennoyer came right away and started digging a new mailbox hole (3 to 4-feet deep) and spray painting all the metal black.

This morning he came early and finished the whole job, and SIL Maryann Enright and I went to the hardware store for sticky numbers for the pole and box.

 

Written by louisaenright

April 18, 2015 at 12:46 pm

Turkey Tracks: Mailboxes and Snowplows

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Turkey Tracks:  March 6, 2015

Mailboxes and Snowplows

I stopped on the way into the driveway to check for mail and thought you might get a kick out of seeing the “problem” of snow plows and mailboxes in Maine in deep snow.

Here you can see how thoroughly shorn my mailbox is from its post.

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Most folks do exactly what I did:  stick the mailbox into the snow bank as best as one can until the snow season is over and the snow bank is gone.

Here’s a picture that shows you how vulnerable the mailbox is to the plows when they are dealing with a lot of snow on the side of the road:

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You can see how far out into what is left of the road the mailbox would be.  I put up several reflective markers, but with all the snow we’ve had, the plow drivers are tired and often are coming down a very steep, curving hill with a load of snow in front.

Stephen Pennoyer tells me “come spring” we’re going to replace this box with one that will swing to the side with the plow’s movement.

Written by louisaenright

March 6, 2015 at 4:55 pm

Turkey Tracks: Stephen Pennoyer: Snow Removal and Pour Over Coffee Stands

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Turkey Tracks:  February 9, 2015

Stephen Pennoyer:

Snow Removal and Pour Over Coffee Stands

 

Stephen called me yesterday afternoon and said “how about a cup of coffee?  You put on the water, and I’ll be up in five minutes.”

We had talked about his making a pour over coffee stand for my pour over cup some time back when he was working here.

This kind of stand lets you see how much liquid is going into your coffee cup without having to lift up the pour over cup.

Stephen came in with three different ones he had been designing.  He had a tall one for a tall mug or for a taller portable coffee cup.  He had a fancy one of about medium height.  And he had this one, which I liked best for my coffee cup.  (Why, oh why didn’t I take pics of the other two?)  Here’s how the stand works, though there is no cone filter or coffee in the filter.

 

 

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In this pic you can see how the coffee will drip through the hole and into your cup.

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Stephen is such a fine craftsman.  I love to see what he makes.

I hope he offers these stands (and more) for sale in some of our local coffee places.

Wouldn’t a gift basket/bundle of one of these stands (he could make them long with several holes too), the pour over cup (or cups), the cone filters, and some coffee make a great gift?  If you are making pour over coffee for two people, it’s much faster to have two cups.

I challenge you to google amazon to see what they are charging for pour over coffee stands.  It’s unbelievable and just plain crazy!!!  Would people really pay this much for one of these stands???

Stephen looked around at all my snow and said I’m going home and getting the snow blower a neighbor lent me.  I’ll be right back.  The next thing I knew, he had made big wide paths around my house and had cleared three feet of snow from the top of the hot tub and cleared the snow around it so I can actually open the lid again.

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Stephen is a very, very special friend!  He’s an angel in my life.

His mother, Mary Sue Bishop is pretty nice too.

 

Written by louisaenright

February 9, 2015 at 2:32 pm

Turkey Tracks: House Projects

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Turkey Tracks:  May 12, 2014

House Projects

 

With spring, I’ve sprung into house projects–with a lot of really good, cheerful, help.

First, Stephen Pennoyer replaced the rainguard over the front door.  Isn’t it nice?

It’s pitched to run rain off into the garden.

I would be way too embarrassed to show you what lived there before now…

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Stephen has now finished the new fence panels that hide the propane tanks and generator.  (See the garlic up in the garden?  And the strawberries?)  And you can also see the new gutter coming down the back of the fence panel next to the garage.

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And another view:

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Busily coming up in these little gardens are the white lily bulbs that Bellevue High School friend (class of 1963) Kay Rood sent me when John died.  I planted them last year, but they didn’t “take.”  Now, here they are like a lovely spring surprise.

Stephen also rebuilt the clothes line–and I had clothes on it yesterday!

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Stephen had to dig through all of this rock–and he dug down about 4 feet or so–to install concrete that will hold these new fences and the clothes line steady through winter ice and spring heaving.

He also dug a long trench between the generator and the back post of the clothes line to sink the new gutter that’s on the drive side of the garage–our effort to redirect water away from the garage floor.  (I had real flooding issues this spring when it rained and the ground was frozen.)

Now I have to get the generator rebalanced–it’s looking a bit tilty.  That generator runs all the power in my house when we lose electricity–and has made life pleasant many times and saved me this winter when it was so cold and an ice storm took out all power and cable here for days and days, including Christmas Day.

Stephen bought a power washer and kindly power washed all my moldy decks and rails and trim.  This whole house is shiny clean outside at the moment.

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Plumber Ben Larner was also here installing the new sink.  We first discussed this project back in the fall of last year.

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And now, here’s the new real cast-iron sink and faucet.  (The old sink was a composite porcelain–not cast iron–and was badly chipped.)

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Meanwhile, I made a dump run to take all the old lumber from the fence panels and the clothes line–where the nicest Camden, Maine, dump employee unloaded the whole lot for me.  That part of the dump was ankle deep in mud, and I had on “good” shoes.  I had determined I’d have to go home and put on boots when he said “No, back her up right here, and I’ll take care of it all.”   LOVE MAINE!

 

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Penny is on the front seat, sucking her blanket and waiting to “go in the car””

Meanwhile, I have installed the temporary chicken fence I use in the summers AND extended it’s height up to about 6 feet.  The whole thing is held together by those plastic ties where you slip one end into the apparatus on the other and pull it tight.  Once on, those ties have to be cut off, so dismantling all in the fall will be…fun.  The chickens are staying put, which means I am winning this round and fox can’t get them.

The refrigerator went belly up last week.  The new one is being installed as I write, and I am glad as it’s a long trip to the garage every time I want a slice of lime for a cup of tea, not to mention any serious cooking.  The good news is that the new refrigerator is gorgeous–French doors and a slide out freezer drawer below.  I HATED the side-by-side GE Profile–it had to be designed by someone who never cooks or stores food.

Here’s a frig for someone who cooks, puts up food, and has a lot of visitors:

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Look at the amazing inside:

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It has two icemakers.  One in the fresh food section that is attached to the controls on the front of the door–for cubes or crushed.  And one in the freezer for heavy-duty use–such as I have in the summer.

 

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As hard as it was to absorb the sticker price, I feel like I’ve died and gone to refrigerator heaven.

And, look at what got its borders on and is ready to load onto Lucy the Longarm:

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I think I should have made the borders 9 inches–as called for.  I did 6 inches.

The backing fabric is cut, matched, and ready to be ironed and sewn together.

This quilting project from Material Obsession 2 has been so much fun and has provided many lovely hours of hand-sewing at night.  For me, it’s all about the work of the hands…

 

And, now, the grass is dry, so the lawn will get its first MOW.  And the black flies will try to feast on me.  I’m not swelling up much this year, so it must be true that one builds up a certain immunity over time.

Turkey Tracks: Bits and Pieces in Early May

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Turkey Tracks:  May 4, 2014

Bits and Pieces in Early May

 

I stopped by Fresh Off the Farm yesterday to get a few vegetables.

I could not resist the organic Driscoll strawberries.  They looked luscious, and I was hungry.

I had some this morning, and I knew from the moment I touched them that I had made a “hungry” mistake:  bright red, but sour as lemons.

* * *

I am so enjoying reading, now, Jennifer McGruther’s The Nourished Kitchen.

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Here’s a quote I wish I had read yesterday when I bought those pitiful strawberries:

Fruits and vegetables prepared in their season bring joy to the table.  As the days turn from dark to light as spring nears, and just when you’ve had enough of hearty stews and root vegetables, the brightest and lightest of vegetables appear–sprouts, herbs, tiny little strawberries, and crisp lettuces.  These vegetables fade and bolt with the heat of summer that, in its turn, brings robust and juicy foods–watermelons, vivid red tomatoes, and plums that drip with juice at the first bite.  The days grow dark and cold once more, and the apples, pumpkins, potatoes, and roots return.  The changing seasons bring excitement and heady anticipation that cannot exist in the seasonless aisles of the supermarket.

I have a feeling that the chickens will enjoy the strawberries.  I’ll be waiting for my own to come into season, and believe me, they are worth the wait.

* * *

I woke to rain this morning.  And, then, magically the sun came out, and I changed clothes and went out.

The project:  replanting the climbing rose and clematis in front of the new fence panels that shield the propane tanks and the generator.  AND, re-carving out the flower beds in front of those panels.

As I worked, it was glorious to see the summer thunderstorm moving towards us.  And to hear it!

It was NOT glorious to see the chickens out of the fence that I installed yesterday.  They are jumping over it from a large bush next to the fence.  But they have to stay inside as fox ate one of the hens this week–one of the two hens that are actually laying.  You will remember that the pattern last year was one missing hen one day, all chickens missing the next…   So as the rain came in, I was shooing chickens back inside their enclosure.  (I have an idea for how to block that jumping off bush.)  And I’m hoping that one of the hens will go “broody” and raise a batch of eggs by my sweet rooster and the one hen that is laying.

Anyway, Miss Reynolds Georgia is terrified by thunder.  She is presently in her laundry basket at my side, shaking and under the covers:

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Anyway, when it stops raining, I’ll post some pictures of all the work that Stephen Pennoyer has made possible at this house.  I have been blessed, blessed, blessed to meet him.  He is so competent, skilled, cheerful, and an awesome worker.  What a gift!

* * *

This quilt will be my 100th quilt–remember it is from Material Obsessions 2:

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Don’t mind the wrinkles around the diamonds–it’s just how the quilt is sticking to the flannel–and I have not ironed much as there are so many biased edges.  I won’t really iron it until I get the borders on it.

BUT, BUT, I think it really needs one more row.  It’s looking way too…SQUARE.

So, I’m picking out fabrics for four more blocks and will “unsew” that bottom row so as to be able to insert the required diamonds.

The diamonds get sewn in on the diagonal lines–with each medallion left unjoined down its center–which is doable…

I think you can see the method of construction on the diagonal lines here.

 

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I was in Alewives quilting in Damariscotta Mills earlier this week and took pictures of the version of this quilt that Rhea Daiute did–the one that drew me to this project in the first place.  I loved the way she used a stripe for the inner border:

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And I love her BIG, BOLD border.  Rhea has the greatest eye for color and pattern.  Here’s a close-up of her blocks and that striped border:

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I could not find a big, bold border so am going with a quieter one that lets the medallions shine.

 

 

* * *

I have finished the baby quilts for the Enright family twins that are in the offing in, hopefully, early June.  Hopefully as everyone wants them to stay put until early June…

We have our Coastal Quilters’ meeting this Saturday, and I want to “Show and Tell” the baby quilts before mailing them on Monday.

Then it’s on to my niece’s baby daughter, also due in June.  I am excited about the fabric that I’ve bought for baby Stevens’ quilt.

Turkey Tracks: Spring Peepers

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Turkey Tracks:  April 26, 2014

Spring Peepers

 

I’ve been really busy with spring projects and spring clean-up.

So you have not heard from me much this week.

The amazing Stephen Pennoyer has taken on many of the projects neglected for the past five years.  He is a meticulous carpenter and all-around building expert.  And he’s been the most wonderful gift in my life as he has taken on jobs that most people would shudder at doing–things like digging drainage ditches for underground pipes and digging big and deep holes to sink new fence posts in–all into earth covered with gravel and littered with land-fill stones.  Always, he is cheerful–no matter the frustration.  And, always, he figures out a way “to do it right.”  I’m “the helper” and am called on to hold posts steady.  Or, help lift something that needs more than two hands or just a big more carrying poundage.

I’ll start posting pictures as he finishes the many jobs we have underway.

Meanwhile, Melody Pendleton was here painting a big downstairs room.

And Riteway Rugs picked up the big Karastan downstairs.  It’s been over 11 years since it has been cleaned.

Those are only A FEW of the ongoing projects.

Meanwhile, I cleaned out (and repaired rusted out chicken wire) on the chicken coop and cage.  That always a HUGE spring job.

I am thankful that it’s a rainy day.  My body needs a rest…

* * *

The peepers–tiny, tiny frogs–have  had a terrible time this year.

First they emerged out of the icy mud only to have a serious refreeze.  Many of us were afraid they had been killed.

Here are some images:  Peepers image – Google Search.

And here is a video I did the other night so you could see how LOUD they are:

Written by louisaenright

April 26, 2014 at 4:24 pm