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Interesting Information/Vaccines: Measles and Measles Vaccines: 14 Things To Consider

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Interesting Information/Vaccines:  April 23, 2015

Measles and Measles Vaccine:  14 Things to Consider

Roman Bystrianyk

Roman Bystrianyk researched and wrote DISSOLVING ILLUSIONS:  DISEASE, VACCINES, AND THE FORGOTTEN HISTORY with Suzanne Humphries, MD

Bystrianyk put together this fact sheet on measles and the measles vaccine, to include the history of both.

Maybe the most important fact of all is the following history:

1. Measles death rate had declined by almost 100% before the use of a measles vaccine

During the 1800s, measles was a notable cause of death. Epidemics occurred every few years causing a large influx of children into local hospital wards. In Glasgow, England From 1807-1812 measles accounted for 11% of all deaths. In the years from 1867-1872, 49% of children in a Paris orphanage who developed measles died. [2] Starting in the mid to late-1800s deaths from all infectious diseases, including measles, began to decline. By the 1930s in England and the United States the chance of dying from measles had dropped to 1-2 percent.

This paper contains some really good charts and graphs that clearly show that when Americans decided to “eradicate” measles, it had virtually already gone away–which is the prevailing pattern for diseases that come into being.

Now, today, ALL American children are expected to be put at risk for the measles shot and all the following boosters–since the shot does not work well in the first place.

This outcome and all the hysteria and politics going down right now are the work of the market, not health or safety.

The loss of civil rights to education and to control over one’s body is beyond astonishing–especially when based on such bad, bad “science” that was also done by…the market.

Do take some time to read this history.

Measles and Measles Vaccines: 14 Things To Consider | GreenMedInfo.

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