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Turkey Tracks: Mt. Battie Modern September Show and Tell

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Turkey Tracks:  October 6, 2017

Mt. Battie Modern September Show and Tell

We had fun at our September meeting.

It was fun to see Joann Moore, who worked all summer.  She brought two quilts with her.  She’s a new grandmother, so there is a fun baby quilt.

And her version of a quilt in Amanda Jean Nyberg’s book NO SCRAP LEFT BEHIND called “Happy Rails.”  Love her use of the blue background and the bright fabrics with it.

Vicki Fletcher has been working on this English Paper Piecing large hexagon quilt.  She is enjoying this project and loves the old-fashioned fabrics.  They are special, and so is she.

Tori Manzi showed us a new bag she acquired from an internet “swap” friend.  Wow!  Great bag.  We examined it in detail as we are, most of us, bag crazy.

Paula Blanchard showed us this small quilt from Amy Friend’s Improv workshop with us last spring.  Amy’s blog is “During Quiet Time,” and the method is in her book IMPROV PAPER PIECING.  This is a “wow” quilt, isn’t it?

Karen Martin has her Tula Pink blocks not only done, but put into a top.  Didn’t it come out gorgeous?  These blocks are a challenge for Coastal Quilters, but Karen is the first person among us to finish a quilt top with the blocks.  We finish making the blocks in December.  I have about 40 more to go, but will catch up soon.  The book is 100 MODERN QUILT BLOCKS, and they are all about the fabric.

Love the sashing fabric with the different intensities of black dots.

Here’s Karen:

Mt. Battie had a challenge to make a “minimalist” quilt, from directions and discussion in the MIGHTY LUCKY QUILTING CLUB 2016 WORKBOOK–“Minimalist Improvisation” by Season Evans.

Here’s Becca’s:

Here’s Paula’s:

And here’s mine:

I am enjoying these exercises.  I am making and using bias tape in both quilts and clothing now.  And I’ve found that I’m thinking differently about quilt compositions all at once–along the lines of the creativity that can come with constraint.  It is freeing somehow.

On to the next challenges–which will make the next two months more interesting.

Turkey Tracks: Fall Quilty 2017 Update

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Turkey Tracks:  September 6, 2017

Fall Quilty 2017 Update

It’s official.

Summer is over.

I confess I love the rotation of the seasons and am looking forward to fall.  Up here in Maine, the trees are beyond gorgeous when they turn, which they are just beginning to do now.

I always think I’ll get some final porch use in September–sitting in the sun and soaking up the last of the late summer sunshine, but the feel of fall is here.  The angle of the sun has changed and the back porch does not get sunshine like it used to.  Time to move some chairs to the upper front deck for that sunshine.  And time to let go of the flower container pots and to start cleaning up flower beds and to winterize.

This hanging pot has been so pretty all summer.  It hangs on the upper front porch, and I can see it from where I sit at the dining alcove table.  This picture is the one I will see in my mind in the dead of winter this year.

The humming birds are still here but will leave any minute now.  They, too, have loved this feeding location and move from the feeder to the actual flowers.  I have two feeders and LOTS of humming birds.  The other feeder is on the back porch, which means these little fast-flying birds are often just skimming any heads whose bodies are sitting on the porch.

Here is the second to last rosette of the Katja Marek millifiore quilt.  I have almost finished the LAST ROSETTE, which will attach to the right side of the one below.  They make up the lower right hand side of the quilt.  I started this project last fall, and it has been a joy.  Up to the point, that is, until I have to figure out how to quilt it.

I slowed down the other day to make this feed bag for a friend:

This time I got the whole thing right side up!

I have almost finished piecing Bonnie Hunter’s mystery quilt “En Provence.”  I’ve had the units completed since last Christmas/New Year’s.  And the pieced blocks and sashes have been on my design wall almost all summer.  One more row of the big blocks and then on to the outer borders.

I find myself really drawn to the outer neutral borders with their hint of the pointy stars.  I find myself wondering what a quilt would look like with these stars (the red ones above) made scrappy and floated on neutrals.

OK, so I know I’m in a “neutral” fabric moment.  I worried about whether or not the stronger neutrals I used would be too much, but they are what are making the neutral areas of this quilt sing.  I really like how they are working in the quilt and will not be afraid to go to a mixing in of stronger neutrals next time.

This quilt, as all Bonnie Hunter quilts do, has a great “skeleton.”  The designs she makes are inventive and wonderful.  But I find that lately I am really drawn to less-busy quilts.  I think that is one reason why I have had such a hard time finishing this quilt.  It will be wonderful when it is done, but it has been a bear to sew.  Very labor intensive.  Very busy.  This year I am going to print out her clues and see the finished quilt before I charge in to making it.  Part of my issue is that I have several projects of my own I am so excited to start this fall.  They are trumping my doing another Bonnie mystery quilt I think.  And it is always ok to give yourself a break for a year.

We were challenged in our new Mt. Battie Modern Quilt Guild to experiment with making a minimalist little quilt–the second “how to” chapter from the MIGHTY LUCKY QUILTING CLUB 2016 WORKBOOK, “Minimalist Improvisation,” by Season Evans.  The plan of action in this chapter was very clear and very helpful.  Here’s what I devised:

I quilted with the walking foot–which was an experiment for me.  And I used a circle cutting tool that works like a protractor–cutting the fabric circle 1/4-inch wider than the freezer paper circle.  I ironed the paper onto the circle and turned in the edges with an iron.  I should have tried to cut the circle free hand of course–as everything else was cut free hand, per instructions.  I wanted to get a handle on sewing curves, so that added to some “play” time with this project.  So, I cut and sewed curves, experimented with the circle cutter, and quilted with the walking foot.  A good exercise, I think.

I spent a fair amount of time working on Vicki Fletcher’s traveling quilt, but those pictures will have to wait until after our next meeting.

 

Turkey Tracks: Mt. Battie Modern Traveling Quilts in July 2017

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Turkey Tracks:  August 12, 2017

Mt. Battie Modern Traveling Quilts in July 2017

Our “traveling” quilts are getting bigger.  AND MORE EXCITING!

Here’s what I did to Joanne Moore’s quilt,  I connected one of her original blocks, the big square on the bottom to the right of the lower stars.  I thought it had the same organic feel of the curved block to the left of it. I added the colorful vertical strips to set off this next section, a la Jen Kingwell.  And, added blocks of “made” fabric, as I know Joanne is “making” fabric too.  Then I added the long sweeping “stem” filled with text-fabric leaves–from a fabric collection on Becca Babb-Brott’s Etsy Store, Sew Me A Song.  We were challenged to make and use bias tape, using a guide from the Lucky Spool Media workbook:  MIGHTY LUCKY Quilting Club 2016 Workbook, chapter one by Krista Fleckenstein, “Quilts from Your Sketchbook:  Shapes and Curves Using Bias Tape.”

Becca Babb Brott did not want her quilt blocks connected.  Lynn Vermeulen added to it by making the AWESOME birds and butterfly blocks.  I can’t wait to see how this quilt turns out.  It’s got some really interesting blocks going on–and more to come.

Becca’s theme words are “The More I Wonder, the More I love.”

Vicki Fletcher added this adorable dog block to Megan’s quilt.  She added the hexie flowers as Megan does a LOT of EPP work, including finishing Willyne Hammerstein’s “La Passacaglia” quilt.  Look at the Cotton+ Steel fabrics and the selvage dog collar.  Megan LOVES her two dogs.  The coral background adds some zip to the other blocks as well.  I love this block addition.

Here’s another shot of  how the blocks in this quilt are shaping up.

Tori Manzi worked on Margaret Elaine Jinno’s quilt–adding the funky, fun, clever “village” components below.  M-E’s theme is “village”–as in, I think, it takes one to…

Love the stained glass church windows:

I am apparently tree crazy at the moment, so, yes, I love these trees.  The funky houses are spectacular!

 

Becca made this amazing line of color paint tubes–carefully geared to the Allison Glass fabrics Tori used in her flying geese circle.  And, I think, the line of on-point squares.  She tried to link the blocks but felt something was missing, so left them alone.

Nancy Wright added the colorful sewing machine and awesome dressmaker fabric to Lynn’s quilt.  Lynn is now saying she does not mind if this quilt becomes larger than a small wall-hanging.  Megan added the embroidered red heart on the left.  Quilters use embellishment and red work frequently.

Becca made this astonishing foundation pieced lighthouse for Linda Satkowski’s quilt.  (She did double duty this month as Margaret Elaine had an operation on her hand, which is much better but not able to sew yet.)

This block is a terrific addition to this quilt.  Terrific.

Linda worked on Vicki’s quilt, adding the smaller stars on the bottom and the selvage tulip with it’s bias strip stem and leaves.  Isn’t that a clever use of selvages?  And the bias tape project here answers Becca’s challenge to us.  The small foundation pieced stars replicate the bigger star with which Vicki started this quilt.  Clever, innovative, adorable ideas here.

I am working on this quilt now–and I’m having so much fun coming up with ideas for this quilt.

We are skipping August as everyone is so busy in this late summer time.  We will again bring the quilts to our September meeting.

I can’t wait.