Louisa Enright's Blog

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Posts Tagged ‘Bonnie Hunter

Turkey Tracks: “Parts Department Party” Quilt

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Turkey Tracks:  May 28, 2019

“Parts Department Party” Quilt

It’s done!

And I really love it…

To refresh your memories, as I’ve been posting about this project for some time now, about four summers ago, Becca Babb-Brott, Linda Satkowski, and I decided to spend some of the summer “playing” with blocks and making enough to share with each other.  We all threw the blocks we made and that were given to us by each other into a bin we each called “the parts department”—following the work of Freddie Moran and Gwen Marston, who pioneered the idea of making fun blocks that would be ready to use when needed.

Both Becca and Linda put together their “improv” parts department quilts this year, so I knew the pressure was on.  It took me a long time to get this quilt together because I had lots and lots of “parts” that needed to be sewn into something useful—like the black/pink stars in the border (made from bonus triangles from a Bonnie Hunter mystery quilt one year) or the broken dishes blocks in the border, or the flying geese formations, and so on.  And on, and on, and on…   I had a LOT of “parts”—too many to work all of them into this quilt, which is actually pretty large.  You know what that means…  There will be more play with fun blocks and another improv quilt down the road.

I really like the Carrie Bloomston “newsprint” 108-wide backing and the striped border—an idea I’ve seen used often on the Red Pepper Quilts blog.  And I quilted with Anne Bright’s Simple Feathers pantograph, which I like and use a lot.  I just wanted to lay down an overall curvy pattern.

Here are pics of parts of this quilt—which contains so many memories of parts of other quilts, of gift blocks from Becca and Linda, and of fabrics I’ve used and loved:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Turkey Tracks: Changing Fabric Tastes

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Turkey Tracks:  March 22, 2019

Changing Fabric Tastes

Back in the day when I first started quilting, I used dark, intense colors.  That’s what was in the market in the 1990s.  And they were beautiful.

I also used traditional patterns, where blocks, when put together, formed internal, secondary patterns—like strings of little colored squares all lined up in diagonal rows.  Traditional patterns, I think, are much like the intersecting interactions of a community—where the whole is made from the intersections.

Here’s a favorite from some years back—a Bonnie Hunter pattern, “Narragansett Blues,” which can be found in MORE ADVENTURES IN LEADERS AND ENDERS.

Here’s another, showing the use of dark, rich colors.

But something happened to my fabric “tastes” over the last five or so years.  I found brights, low-volume neutrals, and whimsical fabrics.  I also found all the greys—down to deep charcoal colors.  And English Paper Piecing with its intricate blocks.

Many of my quilts still have internal secondary patterns—I do love that effect—but many now also have stand-alone blocks, each an individual feature in a matrix of surrounding cloth and other individual blocks.  So, now, in some forms of modern quilting, the individual blocks form a community in the quilt, but one made up of separate individuals.

Look at this pile of quilts, all made in recent years.  They are VERY different from my older quilts.  (The dog is different too.)

Here are two completed EPP projects.

Here’s the charcoal I love, but the stars are low-volume Cotton+Steel.  The internal patterns (see the dark fans) are just…different than a traditional quilt.  (This one is my design, made from a workshop with Amy Friend of the blog During Quiet Time.)

I still love Bonnie Hunter’s patterns, but now I use brights and low-volume to construct them.

And grey:

And, oh my goodness!!!  Look what’s happening now.  Solids!!  Drenched intense color, yes, but very different patterns.

And the journey continues…

Written by louisaenright

March 22, 2019 at 7:38 am

Turkey Tracks: “Absolutely Colorful” Quilt

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Turkey Tracks:  January 5, 2019

“Absolutely Colorful” Quilt

Here is the second quilt gifted to two local sisters (7 and 9) this Christmas.  They are the great grandaughters of a dear friend, Linda McKinney.  AC Slater likes to pose on quilts.

The block is Bonnie Hunter’s “Garlic Knot.”  And the setting with the little crosses in the sashing is also Bonnie Hunter’s design.  Bonnie did a more elaborate piano keys border than I have here, but my center is busier I think.  The block formations would be more graphic is I had used plainer low-volume setting fabrics, but I like all the more complicated low volumes we have these days.

I used this backing once before in the darker grey with turquoise.  It’s Cotton+Steel.

How cute is this backing???

Written by louisaenright

January 5, 2019 at 10:12 am

Turkey Tracks: “Serendipity: Scrappy Surprise” Quilt

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Turkey Tracks:  January 5, 2019

Serendipity:  Scrappy Surprise Quilt

I had such fun making this quilt.  It was gifted to one of two sisters here in Camden, Maine.  The other sister’s quilt follows in a separate post.

Both Bonnie Hunter and Victoria Findlay Wolfe “play” with “making” fabric.  The center of this block is made from my crumb scraps—sewn on to 4 1/2-inch newsprint weight paper.  I worked in faces, animals, and fun images when I could.  These block centers were a leader/ender project for a long time.

I learned to make the other square from one of Bonnie Hunter’s mystery quilts.  Celtic Soltice, maybe.  One uses the Companion Angle Ruler, but positions the top above the strip of fabric to get the wider cut of the square.   The small triangles were cut with the Easy Angle ruler.  (Bonnie Hunter has a combo ruler that combines the functions of these two rulers.) The rest of the block is my design.  And I particularly like the formation of the 9-patch between the block corners and the sashing.

Fellow Camden quilter Becca Babb-Brott (Etsy store Sew Me A Song) helped me pick out the sashing fabric—and this fabric, which I’ve had for 3 or more years now—was probably my first walk into “modern” fabrics and brighter colors.

I adore this backing.  It’s got a black cat, fanciful houses, but also chickens and hedgehogs and so forth.  It’s perfect for this quilt.

Turkey Tracks: This One’s Ready to Sew Together

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Turkey Tracks:  October 27, 2018

This One’s Ready to Sew Together

This scrappy quilt is my own design.  I’ve been working on it for some time now.  I bought the sashing material from Becca Babb-Brott at least three or four years ago.  (Becca has the Etsy store, Sew Me A Song.)

The 4 1/2-inch block centers are “made” fabric from my smaller scraps.  Both Bonnie Hunter and Victoria Findlay Wolfe “make” fabric in this way.  Along the way I began adding in some novelty fabrics to sprinkle throughout the quilt.

I used the Companion Angle ruler to cut the flying geese—but in a novel way to get the top flat edge—which I learned from Bonnie Hunter while making one of her mystery quilts—the Italian-inspired one I think, Allietore.  I used the Easy Angle ruler for the flying geese small triangles.  And all pieces were cut from 2-inch strips.

 

I’ve got the cutest backing for this quilt, and I can’t wait to longarm quilt it.  That day is coming up fast now.  I’m not sure what I’ll use for binding yet.  I might use either the sashing or the backing fabric to bind.  The quilt has not told me what it wants yet.

 

Written by louisaenright

October 27, 2018 at 8:47 am

Turkey Tracks: Coastal Quilters’ 2018 Mothers’ Day Retreat: My Retreat

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Turkey Tracks:  May 21, 2018

My Retreat

I prepped these 2 by 8-inch strips before the retreat:  all low volume Cotton+Steel in the warmer colors.

Here are two rows of Victoria Findlay Wolfe’s herringbone braids, from her book MODERN QUILT MAGIC.

I am really liking what is happening here.

I figured out how long I wanted the quilt and decided I’d done enough work on this project.

Next I put together about ten blocks with my Wild and Goosey quilt block (Bonnie Hunter)

I took papers out of the quadrants I had completed one night while listening to a book on tape in my room.  I have rather a lot of these done now and brought home more to do.

I made two pineapple blocks to learn how–with Heidi August as a teacher.

I learned how to use the Creative Grids 60 degree ruler–a block I use a lot and one we will do for Jen Kingwell’s “Long Time Gone” quilt.  I’ve always used the Tri Rec ruler and like it.  The Creative Grids Ruler leaves more space between the end of the star points and the edge of the block.  It is fun, but you can see that it does not make a perfect star.  One could probably figure out how to make that happen, but for the Kingwell project, I’m going to use the Trip Rec ruler.  However, I do like the funky nature of the stars in the blocks below.  They’ll go into my “parts department” bin for an improv quilt maybe in the fall.

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What I really wanted to do this retreat was to play with my scraps.  I brought them ALL with me, so I got them all out.  Along the way I culled out scraps that were too small or that no longer attracted me.

Here I started playing around with Maria Shell methods from her book IMPROV PATCHWORK–where she makes her own plaids and stripes.

 

Next I sewed a lot of 4 1/2 inch squares–for a quilt in progress.

Here’s that quilt-which is at home on my design wall:

I had some black and white strip sets, so I cut them up and made a checkerboard.  Maybe it will go into “Long Time Gone.”  Or, maybe into the “parts department” bin.

I had a lot of dark charcoal pieces left over from my “Big Star” quilt.  Which block do you like best, big or little?  I am drawn to little every time.

So…

I saw on Bonnie Hunter’s blog that she was making some light/dark squares with strips.  Boy are they versatile.  These are 4 1/2 inches.  (I use newsprint as a backing, cut to size.)

 

These are 3 inches–made because I had some leftover 3-inch paper strips while cutting.

At night I worked on 6-inch hexes, all Cotton+Steel and a solid or two, from Katja Marek’s THE NEW HEXAGON book.  I’ve almost worn this book out.  I’m going to make these blocks like the cover, where they are linked together with triangles, which can make stars on the outside of the blocs too.

I came home with so much energy.  Inspired by Betsy Maislen, I got my “On Ringo Lake” on the long arm.

Turkey Tracks: Fall Quilty 2017 Update

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Turkey Tracks:  September 6, 2017

Fall Quilty 2017 Update

It’s official.

Summer is over.

I confess I love the rotation of the seasons and am looking forward to fall.  Up here in Maine, the trees are beyond gorgeous when they turn, which they are just beginning to do now.

I always think I’ll get some final porch use in September–sitting in the sun and soaking up the last of the late summer sunshine, but the feel of fall is here.  The angle of the sun has changed and the back porch does not get sunshine like it used to.  Time to move some chairs to the upper front deck for that sunshine.  And time to let go of the flower container pots and to start cleaning up flower beds and to winterize.

This hanging pot has been so pretty all summer.  It hangs on the upper front porch, and I can see it from where I sit at the dining alcove table.  This picture is the one I will see in my mind in the dead of winter this year.

The humming birds are still here but will leave any minute now.  They, too, have loved this feeding location and move from the feeder to the actual flowers.  I have two feeders and LOTS of humming birds.  The other feeder is on the back porch, which means these little fast-flying birds are often just skimming any heads whose bodies are sitting on the porch.

Here is the second to last rosette of the Katja Marek millifiore quilt.  I have almost finished the LAST ROSETTE, which will attach to the right side of the one below.  They make up the lower right hand side of the quilt.  I started this project last fall, and it has been a joy.  Up to the point, that is, until I have to figure out how to quilt it.

I slowed down the other day to make this feed bag for a friend:

This time I got the whole thing right side up!

I have almost finished piecing Bonnie Hunter’s mystery quilt “En Provence.”  I’ve had the units completed since last Christmas/New Year’s.  And the pieced blocks and sashes have been on my design wall almost all summer.  One more row of the big blocks and then on to the outer borders.

I find myself really drawn to the outer neutral borders with their hint of the pointy stars.  I find myself wondering what a quilt would look like with these stars (the red ones above) made scrappy and floated on neutrals.

OK, so I know I’m in a “neutral” fabric moment.  I worried about whether or not the stronger neutrals I used would be too much, but they are what are making the neutral areas of this quilt sing.  I really like how they are working in the quilt and will not be afraid to go to a mixing in of stronger neutrals next time.

This quilt, as all Bonnie Hunter quilts do, has a great “skeleton.”  The designs she makes are inventive and wonderful.  But I find that lately I am really drawn to less-busy quilts.  I think that is one reason why I have had such a hard time finishing this quilt.  It will be wonderful when it is done, but it has been a bear to sew.  Very labor intensive.  Very busy.  This year I am going to print out her clues and see the finished quilt before I charge in to making it.  Part of my issue is that I have several projects of my own I am so excited to start this fall.  They are trumping my doing another Bonnie mystery quilt I think.  And it is always ok to give yourself a break for a year.

We were challenged in our new Mt. Battie Modern Quilt Guild to experiment with making a minimalist little quilt–the second “how to” chapter from the MIGHTY LUCKY QUILTING CLUB 2016 WORKBOOK, “Minimalist Improvisation,” by Season Evans.  The plan of action in this chapter was very clear and very helpful.  Here’s what I devised:

I quilted with the walking foot–which was an experiment for me.  And I used a circle cutting tool that works like a protractor–cutting the fabric circle 1/4-inch wider than the freezer paper circle.  I ironed the paper onto the circle and turned in the edges with an iron.  I should have tried to cut the circle free hand of course–as everything else was cut free hand, per instructions.  I wanted to get a handle on sewing curves, so that added to some “play” time with this project.  So, I cut and sewed curves, experimented with the circle cutter, and quilted with the walking foot.  A good exercise, I think.

I spent a fair amount of time working on Vicki Fletcher’s traveling quilt, but those pictures will have to wait until after our next meeting.