Louisa Enright's Blog

Mainely Tipping Points

Posts Tagged ‘Rockland

Turkey Tracks: Quilts By Friends, July 2017

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Turkey Tracks:  August 16, 2017

Quilts By Friends, July 2017

Linda Satkowski is working on Katja Marek’s quilt-let project, from Marek’s web site and from the book THE NEW HEXAGON MILLIFIORE QUILT ALONG.”  She is using this gorgeous, coral color for her background.  I love it and asked her to roughly lay out her mostly finished blocks so we could see them at a recent Mt. Battie Modern Quilt Guild monthly sew-along meeting–Camden, Maine.

AND, friend Elizabeth (Betsy) Maislen, who is now RETIRED, is working on this quilt–which knocked my socks off.  Go Betsy!!

I will see Betsy soon as she will be in and out of my house (as will husband Bill) while she is on the windjammer J&E Riggin, out of Rockland, Maine.  Betsy volunteers and helps Annie Mahle cook.  The two together produce some awesome meals–all fresh, local produce, seafood, and meats.  This year, Betsy will be volunteering for roughly six weeks in September and October.

Turkey Tracks: Come Sailing With Me: Raising the Anchor

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Turkey Tracks:  September 24, 2014

Come Sailing With Me:

Raising the Anchor

 

Hello Everyone,

I’ve been having way too much fun with visitors and have not posted to the blog as a result.

I still have some little videos I took on the J&E Riggin this past trip.

Here’s one on hauling the anchor.

Remember that the Riggin is an authentic windjammer schooner and has no motor to move it (they use a separate yawl boat to push it when needed) or a motor to raise the VERY HEAVY anchor that gets dropped every night.

It takes quite a few willing souls to get the anchor back on the boat.

 

And here’s another video for added information:

 

Written by louisaenright

September 24, 2014 at 12:25 pm

Turkey Tracks: Come Sailing With Me

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Turkey Tracks:  September 7, 2014

Come Sailing With Me

 

I’m just home after spending a magical, gorgeous, fun, inspiring six days sailing Penobscot Bay on the windjammer/schooner J&E Riggin with Captains Jon Finger and Anne Mahle.

Here’s the Riggin as seen from the island where we had a lobster roast:

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There are many, many better pictures on the Riggin web site: http://www.mainewindjammer.com.

 

I forget how many trips John and I made before he got too sick to go, but we qualified as “Riggin Relics,” which meant we’d made 5 or 6…

On this trip, I sailed with a great couple who have made 27 trips over the years–often stringing three together in a summer.  So, beware, being on the Riggin and around Jon and Anne gets into your blood.  It has mine…

Here’s a little video of one of my favorite pastimes aboard:

 

This trip was centered around knitting and featured Margaret Radcliffe, who had just published a new, very useful “how to” book.  Margaret is one of those people who is at the top of her craft.  She has forgotten more about knitting than most of us will ever know. And she was generous with her time and skilled with her help on our projects.  Because knitting was featured, most of the passengers were women–with two sturdy male passenger exceptions, both of whom are married to knitters.

I thoroughly enjoyed these women and will see some of them over the winter and will sail again with some of them next summer.  Emails are already flying around between us.

Here’s Jessica knitting with her morning coffee/tea:

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Jessica is making the hat pattern that Margaret Radcliffe designed for this cruise.  I love her colors:

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Here’s a completed sock on Jeanine’s foot:

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And Pinky (of the 27 voyages) completed this great cowl early on in our trip:

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Pinky is standing in the galley–which is always a warm retreat if one gets cold or needs a table on which to work.  Here are two more pictures of the galley:

 

 

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What you’re seeing is the “eating” end of the galley.  On the other end is the “cooking” end.  Anne and her crew (the amazing Cassie this year) feed up to 30 people (passengers and crew) three meals a day using a wood stove.  There is limited water and no electricity for kitchen save-time tools.  The kitchen “nook” that can’t be more than 6 feet long and with a walkway that is about 3 feet between the stove and cabinets and the sink side.

Anne’s food is…simply…amazing.  Most of her food is FRESH, FRESH as it it locally sourced.  She makes all her own breads–sometimes three different ones each day depending on what’s for breakfast–and there is a home made dessert at both lunch and dinner. Anne has two cookbooks now:  AT HOME, AT SEA and SUGAR AND SPICE.  Both are beautiful AND excellent.

Here’s a view of the boat from the back to the front–you can see the kitchen stove pipe to the left.  This pic only shows about 1/3 of the width of the boat and does not show the long front end or the 10 or so feet behind the camera.  I have never felt crowded on this boat.  Nor had to wait longer than two minutes for a bathroom.

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Here’s Terry swimming off the Brooklin harbor, called affectionately the Wood Boat Harbor as the Wooden Boat School is located there.  This school is a place where you can go and learn how to build various wooden boats that you keep.  I have often seen families working away in one of the buildings to make a boat.

And, yes, I did get to swim this trip–with Jessica, off North Haven island.  The water was cold after the cool summer, but really refreshing as it was a hot day.

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There was a lot of boat traffic this year–and it is so much fun to see sailboats cutting through the water and to hear the wind in their sails.  September is really fine sailing weather.

Here’s the Riggin’s little sail boat with Justin at the helm at Wood Boat Harbor:

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The Riggin always draws traffic when she anchors.  Here are some small boats sailing around us:

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Here’s a sailboat–one of many, many–out on the water either passing us or being passed by us:

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The scenary is beyond spectacular out in this water world.  And it’s impossible to capture it with just a camera.

But…

The sunlight sparkling on the water is breathtaking.

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And there are endless islands and passages between them and beautiful and/or quaint houses on the islands.

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At one point we traveled what is known as Eggemoggin Reach (the site of famous races and regattas) and we went under the Deer Island Bridge with about a foot to spare at the top of our mast–causing all of us to gasp and shut our eyes:

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I have some other short videos (the lobster bake, the last night, raising the front sail, hauling the anchor), which I will post separately, but I will end with this picture of a sunset on the Bay:

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Come sailing with me next year?

I’ll be going on another six-day sail on July 20-25 and an as yet undetermined four-day knitting cruise in mid June.

Written by louisaenright

September 7, 2014 at 2:23 pm

Turkey Tracks: They Came and They Went

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Turkey Tracks:  August 21, 2014

They Came and They Went

 

This blog has been fairly silent since I’ve had my oldest son and my two oldest grandchildren here “summering.”

I picked up Mike and the grandsons in Portland, and the fun began.

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One of the first things we did was to go mushrooming for black trumpets and golden chanterelles:

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I love this picture of the boys.  You can see in their faces the men they will become.

We dried the bounty, and Mike took them home when he left–leaving me the two grandsons for two weeks.

The big draw was the Camden Yacht Club Sailing Camp–their second year and their third year of sailing lessons.

Here’s a gorgeous photo Mike took of the harbor one morning, looking back to the mountains, which are covered with clouds.

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The boys swam most days in the morning during the camp–which involves VERY cold water.  So we lowered the temps in the hot tub (children under 12 don’t have the body temperature alarms that adults have) and let them use it to warm up daily.  They soon discovered the pleasures of skinny dipping in the hot tub and thought themselves very naughty.

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L&H Burger in Rockland, Maine, was also a great spot to warm up–or so the kiddos claimed.  The milkshakes here are just the right size for kiddos to have with their burgers and fries.  One of my own memories is my dad taking us swimming on Saturday morning at Barksdale Air Force Base in Shreveport, Louisiana, and buying us cheeseburgers (with dill pickles inside), fries, and chocolate milk shakes.  I can taste that meal to this day.

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We had one artist excursion downtown–here they are looking back into the amphitheater.

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And here’s at least one thing among many they could sketch:

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Low tide in the harbor and skipping rocks proved to be a much bigger draw for them however:

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They could almost cross the river on the exposed rocks, if I had let them.  The seaweed, though, is very slippery and there are barnacles…

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Archery was of huge interest this year.  I bought them 22-pound recurve bows and good arrows, which was just about right for them.  We had to do You Tube research to figure out how to string them, how to knock the arrows, etc.

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These bows are not play toys and can shoot really far and really powerfully, as you can see from this little video:

Here’s what happens when you misuse a bow by stretching and releasing without knocking an arrow in an effort to tease your brother:

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Lesson learned.

We also kayaked, swam, explored, and read aloud the whole of a nearly 500-page book that Kelly needed to have read by the start of school on Monday, August 18th.

I will go on record to say that I am appalled that schools are getting out in mid June and starting back in mid August.  Kids need time to be kids, and they learn important lessons–or can–if immersed in nature.  This move is NOT about kids, or lost learning over the summer–it’s about working adults who need child care.  And it’s about creating a whole nation of disciplined subjects whose sole purpose in life is to WORK, not to live their lives outside of work.  Rant ended.

I don’t have pics of kayaking or swimming–I just got too busy and wrangling the kayaks with two boys underfoot isn’t easy.  There isn’t so much they can do to help, and they are like puppies when they have free time and are kept in one area–wrestling, etc.

Here’s a pic of Pirate Bo on the last day of sailing camp.  (They dug up a treasure chest in the sand and found “treasure.”)

After a pizza lunch, they headed for the airport and home.

 

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It was a good, good trip to Maine.

 

Written by louisaenright

August 21, 2014 at 11:40 am

Turkey Tracks: Household Dramas

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Turkey Tracks:  March 30, 2014

Household Dramas

 

SMOKE ALARM

The smoke alarm outside my bedroom went off last night about 3:30 a.m.  LOW BATTERY.  That alarm talks to you in a voice that can raise even a deaf person like me from a dead sleep.  Rey Rey jumped off the very high bed (I hope she used the nearby chair) and followed me through the house-check I made to make sure there wasn’t smoke anywhere, etc.  And to get the ladder downstairs so I could reach the alarm upstairs on the third floor. Rey Rey ducked into her bed downstairs–a laundry basket with soft old blankets under the table in my office–and had to be retrieved when the drama was all solved and the offending alarm removed from the ceiling for the night–which meant another trip up and down three flights of stairs.

It took me forever this morning to figure out how to open the battery door… Went online for the manual to figure it out, but couldn’t find a clue–which means most anyone with any brains should know how to open the darn thing.  Only, I didn’t want to break anything by forcing plastic parts.   The little door pulls and kind of swings out.  The online ad said one could change the batteries without removing the device from the ceiling.  Ha!  I’d like to see someone do that.  And it’s easy enough to unscrew it anyway.

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Now I suppose I should check the other alarms as I suppose they might all have low batteries.   But, that will be a task for another day…

Meanwhile, Rey Rey is still a total wreck–made more so when the new batteries went in and the device “talked” again in the piercing, scary voice.

She retreated to the rug in front of the sink–the next best thing to my lap as it is “my” spot in the kitchen–where she sat shaking with terror and refusing to look at the camera.

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BEAUTIFUL DAFFODILS

See those beautiful daffodils on the kitchen counter?

A wonderful friend brought them to me this week–along with a big bunch on the dining room table.

And I have had swollen lymph nodes under one arm, other swellings, an allergy runny nose in spurts off and on ever since.  It took me a few days to figure it out–but it’s those flowers.

I started washing my hands really good to get rid of whatever pesticides I had gotten on my hands from the flowers–and gathered up those beautiful, gorgeous, sunny flowers and threw them on a snow bank.

And my nose has stopped and the swellings are going away…

But I will miss the daffodils and will be so happy to see my own bloom in the meadow this year.

Again, maybe this is a lesson in “slow” flowers/food and staying in the seasons…

 

CLOGGED DRAINS IN GARAGE

So, today is the day that the documentary TOXIC HOT SEAT is being shown at THE STRAND in Rockland, Maine.  I had a leisurely breakfast, dressed with care (the pretty blue sweater I save for “good”), and went to the garage to leave.  At the last moment, as it was pouring rain, I changed my pretty shoes for sturdy rain shoes.

There was at least four inches of water in the garage.

The drains were plugged.

Water, water everywhere and threatening the bottoms of the refrigerator and the freezer.

I went back to the house, changed into LL Bean tall boots, took off my pretty green scarf (a present from DIL Corinne during her pre-wedding parties) that matched my pretty green raincoat that I treasure but that is at least 15 years old, got a toilet plunger and tried to open the drains.

No luck.

I called my wonderful neighbor Chris Richmond, who came down with adorable and growing-fast son Carleton in about 30 seconds.   What a great feeling that was.

Chris had no luck with the plunger either.

Chris determined that the drains were iced up and tried to find their outside outlet–and set about redirecting water flowing down the hillsides into the drainage ditches along the driveway–which had become plugged with too many leaves.  (Next year I’ll do a better job of blowing leaves out of those drains–and maybe get Tom Jackson to deepen them again.  After ten years, they’ve silted up quite a bit.

Meanwhile, Carleton and I “broomed” water out of the garage doors so that it flowed down the hill.  As I only had one big broom, Carleton worked with a snow shovel while I followed him him with the big broom.  (I will be buying another broom forthwith.)

Chris had brought some de-icer pellets and put those down the drains, but it may take some time for them to “work.”

And I went to Renys and bought one of their last de-icer bags and put more down the drains.  And I will go back in a bit to see if I need to put in more.

Now my mind is busily turning over what kind of treats I might be able to proffer to thank Chris and Carleton!

I am a lucky woman to have such nice neighbors.

Turkey Tracks: First Snow

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Turkey Tracks:  November 26, 2013

First Snow

I woke this morning to our first snow.

I love the stillness that comes with the first flakes–and the white sky.

We didn’t get much–but I didn’t start off on my errands until the roads were plowed.  Linda McKinney was here early, and she said the roads were very slippery.

Together we got the house ready for Gina Caceci (Falls Church, VA, beloved neighbor) and Maryann Enright (beloved SIL), both of whom will arrive tomorrow–God willing and the creek don’t rise.  (We are expecting weather tomorrow, but also warmer temps.)

I bought a handmade Christmas wreath at Good Tern Coop in Rockland this morning.  The fresh-cut greenery made the car smell so lovely all the way home.

That’s a bow made from birch bark.

Christmas Wreath

But what drew me in addition was the Pretty Bush (purple) berries.  We had a Pretty Bush back in Virginia, and I have not seen one here in Maine.  But, they must grow here as these wreaths are made from local plants.

Christmas Wresth detail

I will tuck some Christmas Balls into the wreath when I get around to it.

I am a staunch defender of keeping Christmas confined to December.  But Thanksgiving is very late this year, so it’s gobbling up Thanksgiving in all kinds of ways–not to mention that Black Friday has now become Black Thursday and Friday.  But that’s what the market will do if you don’t beat it back into a place that’s good for all people–including the ones that have to work for stores to be open.

I finished the big Wheels of Mystery Block quilt–now named “Earth.”  It’s gorgeous.  I’ll put up pictures after it lands at its new home–which will be after our December Coastal Quilters’ meeting on the 14th.  But here’s a picture of part of the top–I made many of these blocks by hand and then discovered they sew quite well on the machine.  I love all the geometric shapes the block forms.

Earth block

I’ve gone quite mad in the quilt room and have five projects going–six if you count the little clam shell quilt I am hand quilting. Seven if you count the time I spent the other day making more of the fabric strips from small pieces of fabric in my discard bin.  Bonnie Hunter calls them “crumbs.”  I’m making 2 1/2 by 8 1/2 strips–and I showed some in an earlier post.  They will be a border to a quilt one of these days.

I’ve cut out the first kite-shaped fabrics for the first medallion–see earlier post on hand quilting projects.  It’s the quilt from Material Obsessions 2.  And, I’ve marked all the seam joins.  That took quite some time actually.

I am making myself sew together the quilt top of another Dancing Nine’s quilt top–as I’ve got a lot of really beautiful fabric left over from the Wheels of Mystery quilt.  Here’s one set of blocks:

Brown Dancing Nine

I nixed doing a border with half-square triangles–also from this batch of fabric.  It’s too busy and too narrow.  I’ll do the piano keys border again, with a narrow inner border to separate it from the quilt body.  (Bonnie Hunter has the best design eye it seems, and this is her pattern.  These blocks are a bit bigger than hers as I’d already cut 2 1/2 inch strips.)

Bonnie Hunter’s current leader/ender project is with 2 1/2-inch half-square triangles–so I seem to be doing that with these browns.  You can combine the light/dark blocks in at least 50 ways.  I’ve just put these four block together this way until I get more of them.  So stay tuned on this one as I have no idea what will happen with it.

Bonnie Hunter's LeaderEnder Project

I started a leader/ender project with leftover 3 1/2-inch light and dark green strips some time ago.  I now have at least 300 of those blocks.  So, here’s what’s happening–I chose a classic Contrary Wife traditional block with which to experiment–only I made the bigger block a four patch and am paying attention to the light/dark orientation of it so that the quilt will have long runs of light or dark little blocks–something I learned from Bonnie Hunter.

Red and Green 1

Here it is with two more blocks added yesterday:

Red and Green 2

It’s going to be gorgeous!  Everyone comes in says “wow!  I really like that red and green one.”

And I’m pulling from the 2-inch red and green strip bins from the cutting frenzy this summer.  It’s so EASY just to pull pre-cut strips from the bins and not have to wade through a ton of fabrics in the stash:

Red and Green bins

That purple stripe fabric is in the bin by mistake–from my pulling of fabrics for this “fish” project that seems also to be happening:

Fish

I bought a new coat from LLBean a few weeks ago–and none of my scarves go with it really.  I have a hat that’s the right blue, and it’s trimmed with a burnt orange yarn.  So I stopped by Over the Rainbow yarn shop in Rockland yesterday.  Here’s what I came home with–the coat color is the dark, smoky blue in the yarn:

Cowl Project 2

I’m going to make a cowl kind of scarf–and make it twice as long as this one, which has this very interesting textured pattern.  One uses a circular needle to make it, and it knits up REALLY fast–or so I was promised.

Cowl project

How fun is that???

So, now it’s time for me to leave for the monthly meeting of my Book Club.  We are discussing Steward O’Nan’s Wish You Were Here, which I enjoyed rather a lot as it is about a family where the father/grandfather/husband has died and where those left behind have to figure out how to move forward with their relationships–which have altered in the wake of the patriarch’s death.  Nothing will ever be the same again for those left behind, and they struggle in the short space of a week, to come to grips with the immensity of all that has changed.   The novel does not hit you over the head with this truth, though.  Rather, O’Nan patiently and calmly walks through each day and shows you with exquisite subtlety just how much everything has changed.

Turkey Tracks: Bryan, Corinne, Ailey, and Cyanna’s Visit

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Turkey Tracks:  September 24, 2013

Bryan, Corinne, Ailey, and Cyanna’s Visit

Family members are asking for pictures of Bryan, Corinne, and the girls during their recent visit to Maine.

We had a lovely time, and were able to do something fun with Ailey every morning of their visit.  Ailey will be three in late November (Thanksgiving baby), and Cyanna is entering her sixth month.  At the end of their week here, when her parents were packing up suitcases, Ailey wanted to know where Lovey’s suitcase was.  And all the way to the airport, she announced occasionally that she wanted to stay in Maine.

By showing you their pictures, I am also showing you some places along beautiful Mid-Coast Maine.

I picked them up at the Portland airport, and we stopped at LLBean to eat lunch, shop, and take pictures around the boot.  Ailey got a new pair of boots–which she loves and used every day.

Sept 2013,The Girls at the Boot, Sept 2013

We’ve had a lot of fog this year, and Ailey had read all about lighthouses and pea-soup fog.  So, we headed off to Owl’s Head Lighthouse, where obligingly, the fog bank rolled right in, setting off the fog horn.  Ailey talked about lighthouses and fog horns for the rest of the week.

Sept 2013, Ailey at Owl's Head Lighthouse

At the top:

Sept 2013, Owls Head

Here’s the fog bank starting to roll in–the view is from the lighthouse steps:

Sept. 2013, Owls Head

So, we walked down to the pebble beach at Owl’s Head–following a path through the woods.

Sept. 2013, Cyanna, Owls Head with Dad

The pebble beach.  Ailey loves to pick flowers.

Sept. 2013, Ailey, Owls Head Beach

On another day, we walked the Rockland Breakwater out to the lighthouse that sits at the end.  The breakwater was built in 1899 and is a mile out and a mile back–or so I’ve been told.  The granite rocks have big cracks between them–so someone needed to hold Ailey’s hand.  But, it was a beautiful morning–we saw dolphins, all kinds of sea birds, a lobsterman working his tracks right next to the breakwater, and lots of happy people.

See the lighthouse all the way at the end?  Ha!  You barely can…

Sept. 2013, Rockland Breakwater 1

Almost there…

Sept. 2013, Rockland Breakwater 2

One morning Bryan and Corinne took the girls to the carriage trail that is the back way up to Mount Battie.  A creek crosses the trail about a half-mile in, and Ailey had a great lot of fun wading through it in her boots.  (I was at our monthly quilt meeting.)

We took some bread to Camden Harbor to feed the ducks one morning–and to let Ailey throw rocks into the water–an occupation of which her Enright boy cousins seem to never tire.

Sept 2013, Camden Harbor white ducks with friend

Mommy found some boots she liked as well in Maine!

Sept. 2013, Harbor

Cyanna is always happy in her baby carrier–and she is “Daddy’s Girl.”

Sept. 2013, Cyanna at Camden Harbor

Here’s a harbor view:

Sept 2013, Harbor view from park

And I’ll print this shot to make the house photos current.  And the first one of Cyanna with Bryan.

Sept 2013, Ailey at Camden harbor

It was a lovely visit!

Written by louisaenright

September 24, 2013 at 6:12 pm