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Posts Tagged ‘Victoria Findlay Wolfe

Poems: Haiku 11 and Learning Herringbone Pattern

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Poem:  November 27, 2017

Haiku 11 and Learning Herringbone Pattern

11.

November 26, 2017

White birches in the
Winter woods seem like ice spikes
Piercing the sky bowl.

 

Here’s my first attempt at making Victoria Findlay Wolfe’s herringbone pattern—from her new book MODERN QUILT MAGIC.  It uses 2 by 8-inch strips.  This SAMPLE  has been trimmed to make a pillow.  For right now I’m just putting this sample into the Parts Department box.  Lord knows I do NOT need any more pillows in my house!!!

And I learned what I need to know.

I do think that I will use this pattern to make a Cotton+Steel low volume lap quilt—a project I have longed to make for some months now.

 

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November 28, 2017 at 12:29 pm

Turkey Tracks: The Mt. Battie Modern Traveling Quilts in November

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November 21, 2017

The Mt. Battie Modern Traveling Quilts in November

We had POURING cold rain the night of our meeting last Thursday.  Some of those from away elected, wisely, to stay home.

For those who made it to the meeting, these traveling quilts continue to excite us!

On the right  is Vicki Fletcher’s addition to Lynn Vermeulen’s quilt.  The pinks and blues are playing nicely with existing bright colors.  And this addition is opening up room for the quilt to grow, as four or five members have yet to work on it.  Vicki stretched herself by making these curved blocks as she tried making blocks she had never made.

Tori Manzi made a Timna Tarr map of Linda Satkowski’s neighborhood.  (We attended Timna Tarr’s map  workshop at our last Coastal Quilters’ meeting.  See Timna’s map quilts in the gallery at timnatarr.com)

Here’s how the map fits into this quilt.

Here’s G. Bruns’ quilt.  This quilt is in pieces, so we spent some time trying to see where we might begin to connect the blocks.  Linda Satkowski connected the top right pieces by adding the red trees between them.  And she added the hexie flower and the bright green/blue blocks.  I have this quilt now, so who knows what will happen to it next.  My mind is turning over ideas as I work on other projects right now.

I did not get a good picture of Vicki’s quilt.  It’s getting large now.  Lynn Vermeulen added the stars over the forest and cabin

Aren’t these great stars!!!

Becca Babb-Brott added the “never stop looking up” to Nancy Wright’s “star” quilt.  And, the selvage star on the right.  Joann more added the “made fabric” star in blues–a la Victoria Findlay Wolfe.  I hope some of you have iPads and will look at these stars close up.  I promise to get close ups next go round.  This quilt is certain to get more celestial blocks.

My quilt arrived at the Mt. Battie Sit and Sew the next day.  It was so fun to see it as I have not seen it for some time now.  Nancy Wright added the big moon, and G. Bruns added the big feather.

Love this feather and the way the Carolyn Friedlander background fabric works.  And the teacups that Margaret Elaine Jinno made for me–one each for my sons and daughter-in-laws.

Nancy used a collection of fabrics she had to make this moon–Blue Park designed by Karen Lewis Textiles.  I love the curved pieces in this circle.

JoAnn Moore made this star for someone’s quilt–and I have lost track of whose.  It will be put in the right box, and I’ll point it out next time we see the quilts.

JoAnn Moore worked on Margaret Elaine’s “village” quilt.  We placed some of the buildings around Vicki’s square for fun.  JoAnn finished the school’s and flagpole at the Sit and Sew on Friday.  You can see them below.

So, we are having fun.  And now we all have projects to work on for the next two months.  We will see the quilts again in January.

Written by louisaenright

November 21, 2017 at 11:30 am

Quilting Information: Tackling the International Quilt Festival 2014, Houston

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Quilting Information:  November 5, 2014

Tackling the International Quilt Festival 2014

 

DAY ONE:

I flew on Thursday–having driven to Portland, Maine, from Camden (two hours) on Wednesday and having stayed in the Comfort Inn, which lets me park my car.  In Houston, I was swished from the airport in a car (Bettini)–arranged by friend Gina Caceci–who, as it turned out, was in Houston on business at the same time.  She extended by one night, and we had the best visit.  We ate at The Grove, a nice restaurant on the green that sits just in front of the Convention Center and which is less than a block from my hotel, The Four Seasons.  (Don’t gasp as I got a special festival rate when I made reservations back in January–and it is LOVELY to be here.)

Here’s a picture of the deck at The Grove, where Gina and I ate:

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DAY TWO, FRIDAY:

My plane connections Thursday were in Atlanta, and there were quilters on that flight.  One was Shelley Kirk, whom I met again at breakfast on Friday, and we tackled the Festival together.  Shelley is from coastal North Carolina, the Cape Fear/Wilmington area, and is a new quilter.  This show is her FIRST big show.

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Shelly and I did about half of the vendors and, maybe, three rows of quilts–all of which were for sale.  Gorgeous quilts.  I especially liked Russian quilter Olga Milovanova’s “Peasant Yard” 

Of course I did–it was of a rooster.  (This quilt is copyrighted, so I could not take a picture.)  Olga is from the old Russian city of Kovrov, and I could not find an on-line picture of this very special quilt.

Alex Andersen and Ricky Tims of The Quilt Show have a booth, and Shelley and I met Victoria Findlay Wolfe demonstrating her newest quilts.  Victoria’s first book is a delight:  15 MINUTES OF PLAY.  Since then, she’s been making innovative wedding ring quilts (some of which we saw), and that book will come out in January. 

The table they were using had a white covering with names of people that have been on the show.  I saw one of our local quilter’s names among the rest:  Dianne Hire.  That was a fun moment.

We also saw Eleanor Burns at The Quilt Show booth (Quilt in a Day quilts) and later at her own booth.

And it’s always fun to see Deb Tucker of the “rapid fire” templates.  She is so amazing.  The quilts in her “Studio 180 Design” are so interesting, colorful, and beautifully quilted. 

Then we went to The Grove for a late afternoon meal and back to the quilt show for about an hour.  After walking about five hours, I was tired and settled into my wonderful room for the evening.

DAY TWO:  SATURDAY

Shelley took classes all day, and I walked all day.  It took me about three hours to see the rest of the quilts.  And that didn’t include stopping to admire each one separately.  There were so many…  And so many that were so beautiful.

Here are a few favorites–though I could have taken pictures of every single quilt there.  Sometimes I take pictures so that I remember something about the technique in a quilt, and I’m afraid that’s what I mostly brought home in terms of pictures.

When NASA Astronaut Karen Nyberg was on board the International Space Station, she made a quilt block.  Her block pattern was combined with star-themed blocks made by quilters from all over the world.  The blocks were sewn into quilts that look like this one and displayed in this exhibit:  ASTRONOMICAL QUILTS! BLOCK CHALLENGE.  There were about a dozen of these quilts.  And, isn’t this whole idea just so…quilty?

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In the exhibit WHAT’S FOR DINNER, 3-D dinners were exhibited, each on its own placemat.  They were so much fun!

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Of course I fell in love with the exhibit IT’S RAINING CATS AND DOGS.

Here’s “Summer Camp” by Barbara Bates Beasley:

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And, also, Beasley’s “Can We Talk About the Steak?”  Don’t you love her use of purple and green?

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I have been drawn, for some time, to different color variations of one image.

Here’s Deborah Yates’s “A Warhol Zakoosa”–Zakoosa is her dog, a boxer.

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Here’s a log cabin by Mary Cammizzaro.  I’m in a log-cabin moment,and what I liked about this quilt is that the use of one fabric for the dark side of the block.  Interesting…

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Here’s a Lucy Boston variation by Suet-Fern Lee of Singapore.  This block is pieced as an elongated hexie, called a honeycomb.  I am playing around with this block piece as well, but with bright fabrics.  I’m using pre-made paper pieces to make it.  The blocks are linked together with an assortment of different shapes, including the tiny squares you see here.

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Here’s a close-up:

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Here’s a very different use of the New York Beauty block by Carol Anne Ludington.  I LOVE the New York Beauty block.

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Here’s “As American As…” by Laura Fogg, shown in an exhibit highlighting American-made fabrics which are, for the moment, all solids.

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Here’s a gorgeous hexie quilt by Miyuki Hamaba Sanda of Japan.

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Here’s a close-up:

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I took a break after the quilts in the food court–which was HUGE.  The camera could not take in the whole thing.  This is about a third of it.

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I sat with a coffee for a while with a group of four women from the Houston area.  They were gracious and funny and it was a delight to visit with them for a bit.  Then I tackled the other half of the vendors.  I kept running into this group of women with shark hats. 

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I found two patterns for little girl short skirts, a special ruler with a rotary cutter attached that does not slide away from you when you cut, the two log cabin rulers I wanted (I’m long cabin mad at the moment), a plastic widget that sews curves when attached to your machine, and some chicken fabric for a new bow-tie purse as my current one is wearing out.

DAY THREE:  SUNDAY

Bonnie Hunter posted pictures from her quick visit to the show before going to Galveston for a cruise.  She saw Edyta Sitar–one of my favorite quilters–and I did not realize that Edyta and her Laundry Basket Quilts had a booth.  I sought her out, had a lovely visit with her, which included her telling me about seeing Bonnie.  I bought her newest book, HANDFULS OF SCRAPS.  She GAVE ME two of her journals, one for me and one for my local quilt group, Coastal Quilters.  The new book has a gorgeous hexie quilt pattern that I will likely make my winter hand sewing project.  Best of all, I saw many of her beautiful, beautiful quilts up close and personal.  There was one especially that is haunting me and for which I may have to order the pattern. 

Edyta, like Bonnie Hunter, likes complicated quilts with small pieces.  But they use entirely different color arrangements, and Edyta does a lot with very innovative and gorgeous applique borders.  I might have the courage to try one of these borders if I do the hexie quilt.  My only problem is going to be choosing which color scheme to use:  Edyta’s rich warm colors or brighter contemporary colors. 

So, I quit about 2:00 p.m., too tired and too overwhelmed to see or think about another thing.  I got a coffee at Phoenicia foods and sat around the Four Seasons pool and read Edyta’s book–and tried not to think about the blizzard raging back in Maine. 

Dinner will be a salad from Phoenicia as well.  And, the maid changed the room’s clock for me so I will wake up on time now for my 5:30 a.m. pick-up.

It’s been a fun and enriching trip, but I am wild to go home and sew, sew, sew.

Turkey Tracks: Play Quilting

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Turkey Tracks:  January 15, 2013

Play Quilting

I’ve been working really hard on sorting through my quilting stash–all the fabrics a quilter starts to accumulate–and cutting up all the smaller pieces into useable, accessible strips, blocks, or rectangles.  Those of you who follow this blog know that getting my stash under control has been going on for over two years now.  It’s just way too easy to keep buying new fabric for a new quilt without using up leftovers from previous quilts.

I am now using Bonnie Hunter’s coping strategy of keeping only large pieces for the stash and processing everything else.  Out of the greens, I’ve already made a gorgeous green scrappy top and backing–using up a ton of fabric that was just sitting around.  That top is ready to go on the long-arm, so I’ll return to it here when I’ve finished it.  I LOVE it.  It’s a green version of Bonnie Hunter’s “Blue Ridge Beauty” that I’m calling “Green Camden Hills Beauty.”  You’ve seen pieces of this top in earlier posts, and Bonnie’s version is on her web site, quiltville.com.

So, the green part of the stash is under control–dare I say?  And, I’m making good headway on the blue now.  I had already been working at the blue fabrics over the past two years, but I’m astonished how much of it I still have.  So many small pieces that are just lying around doing nothing but taking up space.

Yesterday, I could see that I was close to finishing cutting up the blues, so I let myself “play” at the machine for two hours–jointly working on two different types of projects.  I made myself quit about 8 p.m. last night because I could have gone on and on…

First, in Bonnie Hunter’s system–which you can explore in her four books and on her excellent web site, quiltville.com–NOTHING gets wasted.  The small bits of fabric she calls “crumbs.”  She throws them into a basket and uses them to “make fabric.”  Here’s an example:

Making fabric

These 2 1/2 by 8 1/2 strips will make really cute borders on a quilt when I have enough of them.  Bonnie Hunter uses old paper–phone book paper is the best as its thin and easy to tear away–as a backing.  It’s so much easier and lighter than the muslin I had been using for string-pieced blocks.  You could also use used printed paper from your printer, though that is heavier.

This “making” of fabric is growing in popularity these days.  In addition to Bonnie Hunter’s work, you can see the fun of making and using fabric in OUT OF THE BOX WITH EASY BLOCKS:  FUN WITH FREE-FORM PIECING, Mary Lou Weidman and Melanie Bautista McFarland and 15 MINUTES OF PLAY:  IMPROVISATIONAL QUILTS, Victoria Findlay Wolfe.  Weidman and Wolfe both have blogs as well.

I had some string-pieced blocks left from projects last year and have been throwing strips into a basket for when I wanted to make more of them.  I had only been throwing in strips that were at least 1 1/2 inches.  BUT, after making the border strips above, I can see that strips just under 1 1/2 inches are useable in both the string-pieced blocks and with the crumbs.  Really, the clear 1 1/2 strips should go into a separate box to be used for, say, nine-patches with one-inch blocks.  Or, piano keys borders.

Here’s my string basket, which is getting alarmingly full:

Basket of strips

Only there is a twist:  I’ve been tearing away also selvages with writing or colored dots with a little extra fabric in the strip.  I LOVE writing in a quilt and have become more and more intrigued with thinking how one might use selvage edges that are interesting.  So, here are examples of the kind of strips sith writing and/or dots I’ve been saving:

Basket of strips 2

Here are two blocks I made yesterday, hanging with one I already had.  I was playing with using the strips with writing on them:

Strip Piecing 1

Here’s a close-up:

Strip Piecing 2

And what the blocks might look like if I put them on point with sashing between…

Strip Piecing 3

Bonnie Hunter has lots of ideas of how to combine blocks when you have enough of them.

Meanwhile, it was really fun to let myself have a little “play” time–even though I have a quilt loaded on to the long arm and the BIG green quilt ready to be long-arm quilted.

Turkey Tracks: Current Projects

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Turkey Tracks:  April 6, 2013

Current Projects

Spring is on the move, but we’ve had a chilly, if sunny, week.

One of my current projects is to practice taking more videos in order to learn what works and what doesn’t.  I erased quite a few for various reasons.  One reason is that it is very hard to hold the cameras steady.  Here’s one of the Camden Harbor at low tide, with the spring-full river pouring into it.  At high tide, the water would rise to a foot or two below the docks.  The wind is high and the noise of it and of the river interferes a bit with what I’m saying.

It’s elver season, and people trap them at the mouths of rivers–as near as I can determine.  Elvers are little eels that fetch the most astonishing prices per pound.  These little guys are sold alive to the Japanese, mostly, who then raise them to be much bigger before eating them.

Have you ever eaten eel?  It’s delicious actually.  You could try it in a sushi restaurant.  It’s cooked with a sweet sauce of some sort.

Anyway, here’s the video:

I’ve almost finished a pair of socks for my sister-in-law, Maryann Enright.  She chose the yarn just before John died.  We had a nice visit one day around early December to our newest yarn shop in Rockland, Maine, called Over The Rainbow.  It’s a fabulous yarn shop, and we are so lucky to have it.  I think these socks might be a bit wilder than Maryann imagined, but she will rise to the occasion with them.  The yarn does not have black in it, but deep navy and dark plum and a tiny bit of dark brown.

Maryann's socks

I am working on an applique quilt made with big blocks of green turtles.  I have not done any applique in some time and am very slow at it, so I refreshed my skills (ha! that’s a joke) with this little Easter Card for Maryann–in a class at Coastal Quilters taught by Barb Melchiskey, who is a master appliquer.  If I were doing this card again, I’d chose either a colored card or a colored background.  The two whites aren’t working so well together, and I don’t like the lines running away from the eggs.  But the eggs!  Ah, the eggs.  Perfect for this very eggy household.

Egg Applique

The turtle applique quilt will get a lot of quilting to bring out texture in the blocks–on the domestic machine.  But, here’s one block ready to go.  Now I need to do more.  I have not decided whether to do 6 or 9 blocks…

Green Turtle block

What is really drawing me is the scrap quilt taking shape on the design wall.  This one calls me from other rooms to work on it.  I have fallen in love with Bonnie Hunter and ALL of her books:  LEADERS AND ENDERS, SCRAPS AND SHIRTTAILS I AND II, and STRING FLING.  She embodies the kind of work I love best to do–make functional quilts that people can curl up under or into and use as much of the stash fabrics as possible.

Bonnie’s motto is reuse, repurpose, recycle.  She has a monthly column in QUILTMAKERS and her web site is awesome.  There must be 50 free quilting patterns on that web site.  She’s coming in May to our state guild, Pine Tree Quilting Guild, on May 5th, and I will be there to see her quilts and meet her, God willing and the creek don’t rise.

Bonnie Hunter also promotes Victoria Findlay Wolfe’s new book:  15 MINUTES OF PLAY , which is so much fun.  Both Hunger and Wolfe are having way too much fun with their quilts, and both employ string piecing methods to great advantage and fun in their quilts.

Anyway, Hunter uses a method that I really like.  She cuts any pieces of fabric in her stash smaller than a fat quarter, or at the biggest, a half yard, into strips:  3 1/2 inches, 2 1/2 inches, 2 inches, 1 1/2 inches.  (I also cut 5 inches as I have rather a lot of those now and want to make a broken dishes block with them.)  These measurements work well together.  She divides these strips into light and dark piles.  When she starts a project, she’s already done a lot of cutting.  And she can cut the strips further down with rulers, like the Easy Angle ruler, into the shapes she wants.  (She also likes the Tri Rec ruler set.)  I’ve been using the Easy Angle ruler, and it makes PERFECT half square triangles, as long as you have an accurate 1/4 inch sewed seam.

This quilt started using Bonnie’s method described in LEADERS AND ENDERS, where you keep a basket next to your machine with some block parts in it–like two-inch squares.  When you would need to cut thread on another project, instead, you just feed a light and dark set of squares through the machine and cut off the piece you wanted to free on the back side of the needle.   In no time, you have a pile of sets of two squares sewn together.  You can finger press those and sew them to another set for a four-square–and so on.

Well!

Here’s what happened in short order at my sewing machine–the idea came from Hunter’s LEADERS AND ENDERS.  And it’s putting a real hurt on my green stash fabrics!!!!  I’m no longer just piecing squares  through the machine while working on another project.  I’m making time to make as many blocks as I can.

Quilt in Progress

Here’s the block:  a form of a Jacob’s Ladder block, depending on where you locate the dark and light of the half-square triangles.

Quilt block

I iron the half-square triangle blocks along the way, but I don’t iron the whole block until I’ve finished it.  I’ve had to trim up very, very few of them.  All have been a bit too big–with stretching from ironing mostly I think.  None have been too small.  Most are perfect.

The squares quickly overflowed from the basket as I cut into my stash.

Quilt squares

The basket got filled with half-square triangle pieces:

Quilt triangles

And I have a pile of strips all cut and ready to be cut further–and separated by value–so Bonnie is right that just a bit of cutting each day delivers a lot of sewing for days to come.  She also says that she groups medium and dark values together and relies on the REALLY light fabrics to create contrast in a quilt like this one.

Quilt strips

I finished and mailed a beautiful quilt for a beautiful bride, Ashley Malphrus, who will be married in Charleston later this month.  I will put up pictures when I get home from Charleston, and the bride has seen the quilt.  But I am delighted with it.

So, I will leave you with this picture:  the last bouquet of flowers from our CSA, Hope’s Edge, last summer.  Those days are coming around again.  Look at all that green in the windows.

Hope's Edge, last boquet, Sept. 2012