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Posts Tagged ‘Jacquie Gering

“My Pips” Quilt

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Turkey Tracks/Books: February 26, 2021

“My Pips” Quilt

Here’s “My Pips” quilt:

You may recall that this quilt is a project in the current season (3) of The Color Collective, hosted by Amy Newbold’s Sewtopia, and with projects by designer and quilter extraordinaire Tara Faughnan and one month with another designer—this year it is Latifah Saafir. I think the fabric palette Tara chose for this project was just delicious. I cut and sewed until I ran out of fabric.

I quilted on my domestic with a walking foot (see the book WALK by Jacquie Gering) with a medium grey Gutterman thread, using a swirly pattern I saw in a post in Debbie’s A Quilter’s Table blog. I did not do the opposite diagonal as the quilt told me it was done. Pips are apple seeds, and this quilting pattern made me think of spring winds swirling through apple trees as they begin to leaf out in spring.

I would also say that I lost some of my points on the top and bottom rows—as the quilting shrank up the quilt, as quilting does. I think if I were to make this block again I would set my top and bottom rows BEFORE trimming those blocks at the top and bottom—and would only trim them after the quilting was finished.

I had enough of Carrie Blomston’s “Newsprint” fabric (108 wide leftovers) to cover the back, and I ordered more of the Kona “Thistle” in this palette for the binding and for another project as well.

I can see other uses for this block—for sure. It could be made to highlight a printed fabric in a quilt for someone to whom the fabric would “speak.” Learning about using Sewline glue to hold the curves while one sews is an awesome trick.

I’ll use this picture to make a photo card to have on hand—I’ve been doing these cards for years now and use them for every purpose where I need to send a card.

Thank you Tara Faughnan for this beautiful project!

Jan Corson’s “Temperature” Quilt

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Turkey Tracks and Books: February 24, 2021

Jan Corson’s “Temperature” Quilt

One of the projects in our Mt. Battie Modern Quilt Guild this past year was to make Temperature quilt during the year, starting in January 2020.

Jan Corson sent me pics of her finished Temperature Quilt the other day. And it is quite interesting and engaging.

Jan and I have been exploring methods and patterns in Jacquie Gering’s book WALK, which uses one’s walking foot to quilt. Jan used the information in the book to quilt her Temperature quilt.

The big “reveal” of several ongoing challenges will occur later this month in the Mt. Battie Modern Quilt Guild meeting. So pics of these challenge projects will be on the Mt. Battie Facebook page some time after the reveal.

WALK: Quilting With Your Walking Foot

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Turkey Tracks: February 8, 2021

WALK: Quilting With Your Walking Foot

There are some quilts I make that just don’t want to go on the longarm. A longarm machine quilts side to side, so any kind of long diagonal line, or, even, a straight line that runs down the length of the quilt, would not work well with my machine’s 18-inch throat.

Jacquie Gering’s book WALK comes to the rescue of how to quilt with your walking foot.

Debbie of her A Quilter’s Table blog recommended this book, and you can see her work with this kind of walking foot quilting in so many of the quilts in her gallery.

What I learned immediately is how to figure out exactly where the needle is when the walking foot is installed—so that it is easy to make clear, precise lines AND to echo curves. Some of the quilting designs are just…amazing.

If you read this blog at all you know that I love learning curves—especially quilty learning curves. So, you will not be surprised to learn that I’m going to quilt “My Pips” with curves made with my walking foot.

Written by louisaenright

February 8, 2021 at 9:02 am

Turkey Tracks: The Maine Modern Quilt Guild Show

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Turkey Tracks:  April 8, 2018

The Maine Modern Quilt Guild Show

Two carloads of our local quilters drove over to New Gloucester, Maine, Saturday, to view The Maine Modern Quilt Guild show.  To the best of my knowledge, this guild and our Mt Battie Modern Quilt Guild are the only modern quilt guilds in the state.

We all had such a good time.  The show was wonderful, and we went home with all kinds of new inspiration bubbling in our heads.  My apologies up front to all quilters whose quilts do not show up here.  I could have taken a picture of every quilt there for sure.  Each quilt was draped over a church pew and had one corner turned so viewers could see the backing fabrics.  And I should have taken a picture of all the church pews with their quilty occupants.

Our local quilt groups (Coastal Quilters and Mt. Battie Modern) challenged ourselves to make Tula Pink’s 100 modern quilt blocks last year.  We have all set our blocks differently, but none of us thought to surround blocks with internal sashing.   I particularly like the use of different sizes of the white sashing in this quilt.  Notice the lower left block.  I had a lot of trouble squaring up these blocks, and this solution would really have helped.  I missed the number on this quilt, but by process of elimination I think it is Sandy Johnson.

Sue Duval’s quilt–more internal sashing:

Jane Hann Morey’s quilt:

Solids, made stripes, funky in places–this form is showing up a lot these days, and I love it.  The go-to designer is Maria Shell, from Alaska, and she has a new book out:  IMPROV QUILTING, which teaches how to make your own stripes and shapes and then how to use them.

Ann-Marie Schechtman:

Ellie Fellers:

Ellie Fellers, I think:

Betsy Cannan:  from a pattern by Amy Garro.  Amy Friend’s work is also similar to this quilt.

Carmen Dickinson:  inspired by Jacquie Gering and Katie Pedersen

Clam shells:  Sharon Provost and Rose Oleksaiak (no. 12).  All three inspired by Latifah Saafir:

Carmen Dickinson, inspired by Elizabeth Hartman.  Look at the machine quilting by Betsy Cannan in this quilt.  Lovely.

Evelyn Landry:  inspired by Mary Thomas.  Love the modern colors in this quilt.  Each block uses solids and ONE patterned fabric.

Innovative courthouse block form here.  And I can’t read the name…  Sorry…

Ann-Marie Schechtman:  inspired by Stephanie Dicola:

This quilt was hanging in an adjoining room and had no attribution.

Demonstrations included foundation paper piecing and working with pearl cotton.  Isn’t this piece lovely?

And this one too.

Karen Martin bought this little zippered bag/pouch.  We loved the way the wedges were cut for the front.  Clever use of scraps.

Yes, we had a nice time.